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RECENT UPDATES TO OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES
Updates made to Airframes database for : Wellington T2610 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Wellington lost engine power and ditched into the North Sea. The injured crew were rescued by the SS Tovelil two days later.)
Updates made to Airframes database for : Flying Fortress 42-3166 : Squadrons updated (added 301st Bomb Group)
Updates made to Aircrew database for : W. F. Hurst :
Updates made to Airframes database for : Hampden X3001 : Airframe notes updated (added 10-02-1941 : Hampden was shot down by a night-fighter and crashed north of Alkmaar in Holland.)
Wellington Mk.IC L7811 of No.149 Sqn RAF added to the airframes database.
SEARCH OUR AVIATION HISTORY DATABASES

92nd Bomb Group

Founded :
Country : US
Fate :

92nd Bomb Group

92nd Bomb Group Artwork Collection



Schweinfurt - The Second Mission by Robert Taylor.

Aircraft for : 92nd Bomb Group
A list of all aircraft known to have been flown by 92nd Bomb Group. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Flying Fortress



Click the name above to see prints featuring Flying Fortress aircraft.

Number Built : 12677

Flying Fortress

In the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ½ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes
Signatures for : 92nd Bomb Group
A list of all signatures from our database who are associated with this squadron. A profile page is available by clicking their name.
NameInfo

First Lieutenant Frederick J Bird
Click the name above to see prints signed by First Lieutenant Frederick J Bird
First Lieutenant Frederick J Bird

Navigator with the 326th BS, 92nd Bomb Group, Fred Bird flew 14 combat missions on B 17 Fortresses, his first being on 26 August 1943. Following the second raid on Schweinfitirt he was later shot down and taken prisoner of war. He remained captive until liberated on 29 April 1945.




Captain Vernon L Grim
Click the name above to see prints signed by Captain Vernon L Grim
Captain Vernon L Grim

After joining the service in 1942, Vernon's operational squadron in England was the 407 Sqn, 92nd Bomb Group, based at Poddington, the oldest group in the ETO. Flying the B17 he participated in many of the major raids over Germany, including 4 missions to Berlin, and in the D-Day operations in occupied Europe. Later, losing an engine over Hamburg, he was glad of the help from two P38s who escorted him all the way back to England.



Lieutenant Colonel William P Kincheloe
Click the name above to see prints signed by Lieutenant Colonel William P Kincheloe
Lieutenant Colonel William P Kincheloe

Bill Kincheloe joined the service in April 1942, training as a pilot. He was posted to England to join the 327th Squadron, 92nd Bomb Group (Fames Favoured Few), based at Podington in Bedford, flying B-17s. His first combat mission was on 18 December 1943, when the 92nd went to Kiel, and in the following months other notable targets included the heavily defended factories at Schweinfurt. Bill flew a total of 28 raids to the Reich during his tour, all on B-17s, and six of which he commanded. After World War II Bill flew KC135s during the Vietnam War. He retired from the service in 1972.



General J Kemp Mclaughlin
Click the name above to see prints signed by General J Kemp Mclaughlin
General J Kemp Mclaughlin

As a Second Lieutenant in October 1942, Kemp McLaughlin had already brought a heavily damaged and burning B 17 safely home whilst under heavy attack from German aircraft. It was a suitable prelude to the dangers that would face him and his crew a year later when on 14 Oct 1943, he was the pilot of the 92nd Bomb Group's B 17 Equipose, the mission command plane during the second mission to attack the ball-bearing factory at Schweinfurt. Under constant attack from German fighters for almost six hours, he again brought the crew safely home. The following month he was deputy air commander on a bombing raid in Norway, when his aircraft lost oil pressure due to one engine overheating. The crew carried on to the target, but on the return to England were attacked by fighters. Unable to return fire because all guns had been thrown overboard to lighten the aircraft, he skilfully coaxed his plane safely back to base. His 'luck' continued when in December 1944 he was air commander on a raid during the Battle of the Bulge when shrapnel pierced his scat a few inches from him, he was uninjured.



Captain Robert Paris
Click the name above to see prints signed by Captain Robert Paris

21 / 9 / 2010Died : 21 / 9 / 2010
Captain Robert Paris

Joining up in June 1940, Rob Paris qualified with dual rating as pilot and navigator, flying a total of 52 combat missions on B17s. Posted first to the 8th Air Force in England, Rob flew with the 325th Squadron of the 92nd Bomb Group, completing his first mission in October 1942. In November he was posted to join the 12th Air Force in North Africa, again with B17s, joining the 342nd Squadron of the 97th Bomb Group. Amongst others, he participated in raids on the Italian Fleet in Trieste and Gorizia, the battle of Kasserine Pass, at Palermo during the Invasion of Sicily, as well as raids on the Italian mainland. Rob flew a total of 52 combat missions on B17s, and was Lead Navigator of many 100-plane missions. Sadly Rob passed away on the 21st September 2010, he was honored in december during a ceremony at National Cemetery in Phoenix with a fly over by a vintage B-25 aircraft.


Aviation History Timeline : 5th September
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
5September1917Walter Hohndorf, a WW1 Ace with 12.00 victories, died on this day
5September1940 Eric Stanley Lock of No.41 Sqn RAF shot down a He111
5September1940 Eric Stanley Lock of No.41 Sqn RAF shot down a He111
5September1940 Eric Stanley Lock of No.41 Sqn RAF shot down a Me109
5September1940 Eric Stanley Lock of No.41 Sqn RAF shot down a Me109
5September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/Lt. F. W. Rushmer of 603 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O J. T. DFC Webster of 41 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O D. C. Winter of 72 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O P. J. C. King of 66 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, S/L. H. R. L. DFC Hood of 41 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. P. C. AFC Pinkham of 19 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. A. L. Mcnay of 73 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1940John Webster, a WW2 Ace with 15.00 victories, died on this day
5September1940Oberfeldwebel Werner Machold of 7./Jagdgeschwader 2 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1940Oberleutnant Heinrich Paepcke of 7./Kampfgeschwader 30 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1940Oberstleutnant Johann Schalk of III./Zerstörergeschwader 26 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1940Oberstleutnant Otto Höhne of Kampfgeschwader 54 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1940Pilot Officer Michael Boddington of No.234 Sqn RAF shot down a Me109
5September1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. E. F. Howarth of 501 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1942Former French Battle of Britain pilot, Adj F. H. E. J. A. De Laboucher of 85 Squadron, was Killed.
5September1942Wing Commander Roland Beamont of No.609 Sqn RAF shot down a Ju88
5September1943Heinz Schmidt, a WW2 Ace with 173.00 victories, died on this day
5September1943Knight's Cross recipient Heinz Schmidt of 6./Jagdgeschwader 52 died on this day
5September1944Fahnenjunker-Feldwebel Hannes Trenke of 6./Kampfgeschwader 1 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Feldwebel Karl Kulp of 13./Fallschirm-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 4 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Feldwebel Karl-Heinrich Welzel of 7./Schlachtgeschwader 10 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Gefreiter Herbert Fries of 2./Fallschirm-Panzer-Jagd-Abteilung 1 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944General der Flakartillerie Job Odebrecht of II. Flakkorps was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Generalleutnant Ernst Buffa of 12. Flak-Division was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Generalleutnant Rudolf Meister of IV. Fliegerkorps was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Hauptmann Eberhard Stüwe of III./Kampfgeschwader 77 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Hauptmann Erich Beine of I./Fallschirmjäger-Regiment 12 was posthumously awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Hauptmann Friedrich Hauber of II./Fallschirmjäger-Regiment 12 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Hauptmann Herbert Nölter of 2./Kampfgeschwader 3 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Hauptmann Kurt Seyfahrt of Stabsstaffel/Kampfgeschwader 2 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Hauptmann Reino Hamer of I./Fallschirmjäger-Regiment 7 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Leutnant Eginhard Weißmann of 1./Schlachtgeschwader 2 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Leutnant Horst Schimpke of 1./Fallschirm-Panzer-Jäger-Abteilung 1 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Leutnant Rudi Dassow of II./Zerstörergeschwader 26 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Major Wilhelm Sell of Nahaufklärungs-Gruppe 5 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Oberfeldwebel Georg Pöthig of 8./Schlachtgeschwader 2 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Oberfeldwebel Paul Brandt of Jagdgeschwader 54 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Oberfeldwebel Willi Rein of Stabsst./Kampfgeschwader 53 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Oberleutnant Alexander Raab of I./Kampfgeschwader 77 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Oberleutnant Alois Magg of 9./Kampfgeschwader 2 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Oberleutnant Ernst Schöbitz of 11. (H)/Aufklärungs-Gruppe 12 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Oberleutnant Heinrich Welken of 2./Flak-Regiment 231 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1944Oberstleutnant Erich Pietzonka of Fallschirmjäger-Regiment 7 was awarded the Knight's Cross
5September1982Douglas Bader, a WW2 Ace with 23.00 victories, died on this day
5September1982Former British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. D. R. S. Bader of 242 Squadron, Passed away.
5September1982Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader CBE, DSO*, DFC*, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
5September2007Ernst-Wilhelm Reinert, a WW2 Ace with 174.00 victories, died on this day
5September2007Hauptmann Ernst Wilhelm Reinert, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
5September2007Knight's Cross recipient Ernst-Wilhelm Reinert of 4./Jagdgeschwader 77 died on this day

 

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