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Low Cost Me262 Art Print Pack. - Airforce-Art.com

KW4.  Defence of the Reich by Keith Woodcock. <p>The Me 262 was so fast that German pilots needed new tactics to attack Allied bombers. In the head-on attack, the closing speed of about 320 metres per second was too high for accurate shooting. Even from astern, the closing speed was too great to use the short-ranged 30 mm cannon to maximum effect. Therefore, a roller-coaster attack was devised. The 262s approached from astern and about 1,800 m higher (5,900 ft) than the bombers. From about 5 km behind (3.1 mi), they went into a shallow dive that took them through the escort fighters with little risk of interception. When they were about 1.5 km astern (0.93 mi) and 450 metres (1,480 ft) below the bombers, they pulled up sharply to reduce their excess speed. On levelling off, they were 1,000 m astern (1,100 yd) and overtaking the bombers at about 150 km/h (93 mph), well placed to attack them.  Since the 30mm MK 108 cannon's short barrels and low muzzle velocity of 540 m/s (1,800 ft/s) rendered it inaccurate beyond 600 metres, coupled with the jet's velocity which required breaking off at 200 metres to avoid colliding with the target, Me262 pilots normally commenced firing at 500 metres. Turret gunners of Allied bomber aircraft found that their manned electrically powered gun turrets had problems tracking the jets. Target acquisition was difficult because the jets closed into firing range quickly and remained in firing position only briefly, using their standard attack profile, which proved more effective.  In February 1944, the USAAF introduced the P-51 Mustang, a fighter capable of escorting the USAAF bombers to and from their targets. With new fighter tactics, the Eighth Air Force gained air supremacy over Nazi Germany by the spring of 1944 against the Luftwaffe. By the summer of 1944, the Luftwaffe was also suffering from chronic fuel shortages and a lack of trained pilots and it ceased to be an effective fighting force by 1945. By the end of the campaign, American forces claimed to have destroyed 35,783 enemy aircraft and the RAF claimed 21,622, for a total of 57,405 German aircraft claimed destroyed. The USAAF dropped 1.46 million tons of bombs on Axis-occupied Europe while the RAF dropped 1.31 million tons, for a total of 2.77 million tons, of which 51.1 percent was dropped on Germany.<b><p>Open edition print. <p> Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 24cm)
IW5. Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie. <p>An Me262B-1a of 10/NJG.11 Kommando Welter climbs to operational altitude to begin an anti-Mosquito patrol in March 1945.  The Royal Navy's best test pilot, Captain Eric Brown, chief naval test pilot and commanding officer of the Captured Enemy Aircraft Flight Royal Aircraft Establishment, who tested the Me 262 noted: <i>This was a Blitzkrieg aircraft. You whack in at your bomber. It was never meant to be a dogfighter, it was meant to be a destroyer of bombers... The great problem with it was it did not have dive brakes. For example, if you want to fight and destroy a B-17, you come in on a dive. The 30mm cannon were not so accurate beyond 600 metres. So you normally came in at 600 yards and would open fire on your B-17. And your closing speed was still high and since you had to break away at 200 meters to avoid a collision, you only had two seconds firing time. Now, in two seconds, you can't sight. You can fire randomly and hope for the best. If you want to sight and fire, you need to double that time to four seconds. And with dive brakes, you could have done that.</i><b><p>Open edition print. <p> Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 29cm)

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  Website Price: £ 36.00  

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Low Cost Me262 Art Print Pack.

PCK2793. Low Cost Me262 Art Print Pack.

Aviation print pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

KW4. Defence of the Reich by Keith Woodcock.

The Me 262 was so fast that German pilots needed new tactics to attack Allied bombers. In the head-on attack, the closing speed of about 320 metres per second was too high for accurate shooting. Even from astern, the closing speed was too great to use the short-ranged 30 mm cannon to maximum effect. Therefore, a roller-coaster attack was devised. The 262s approached from astern and about 1,800 m higher (5,900 ft) than the bombers. From about 5 km behind (3.1 mi), they went into a shallow dive that took them through the escort fighters with little risk of interception. When they were about 1.5 km astern (0.93 mi) and 450 metres (1,480 ft) below the bombers, they pulled up sharply to reduce their excess speed. On levelling off, they were 1,000 m astern (1,100 yd) and overtaking the bombers at about 150 km/h (93 mph), well placed to attack them. Since the 30mm MK 108 cannon's short barrels and low muzzle velocity of 540 m/s (1,800 ft/s) rendered it inaccurate beyond 600 metres, coupled with the jet's velocity which required breaking off at 200 metres to avoid colliding with the target, Me262 pilots normally commenced firing at 500 metres. Turret gunners of Allied bomber aircraft found that their manned electrically powered gun turrets had problems tracking the jets. Target acquisition was difficult because the jets closed into firing range quickly and remained in firing position only briefly, using their standard attack profile, which proved more effective. In February 1944, the USAAF introduced the P-51 Mustang, a fighter capable of escorting the USAAF bombers to and from their targets. With new fighter tactics, the Eighth Air Force gained air supremacy over Nazi Germany by the spring of 1944 against the Luftwaffe. By the summer of 1944, the Luftwaffe was also suffering from chronic fuel shortages and a lack of trained pilots and it ceased to be an effective fighting force by 1945. By the end of the campaign, American forces claimed to have destroyed 35,783 enemy aircraft and the RAF claimed 21,622, for a total of 57,405 German aircraft claimed destroyed. The USAAF dropped 1.46 million tons of bombs on Axis-occupied Europe while the RAF dropped 1.31 million tons, for a total of 2.77 million tons, of which 51.1 percent was dropped on Germany.

Open edition print.

Image size 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches (37cm x 24cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

IW5. Moskito-Jager by Iain Wyllie.

An Me262B-1a of 10/NJG.11 Kommando Welter climbs to operational altitude to begin an anti-Mosquito patrol in March 1945. The Royal Navy's best test pilot, Captain Eric Brown, chief naval test pilot and commanding officer of the Captured Enemy Aircraft Flight Royal Aircraft Establishment, who tested the Me 262 noted: This was a Blitzkrieg aircraft. You whack in at your bomber. It was never meant to be a dogfighter, it was meant to be a destroyer of bombers... The great problem with it was it did not have dive brakes. For example, if you want to fight and destroy a B-17, you come in on a dive. The 30mm cannon were not so accurate beyond 600 metres. So you normally came in at 600 yards and would open fire on your B-17. And your closing speed was still high and since you had to break away at 200 meters to avoid a collision, you only had two seconds firing time. Now, in two seconds, you can't sight. You can fire randomly and hope for the best. If you want to sight and fire, you need to double that time to four seconds. And with dive brakes, you could have done that.

Open edition print.

Image size 16.5 inches x 11.5 inches (42cm x 29cm)


Website Price: £ 36.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £40.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £4




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Aviation History Timeline : 21st October
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
21October1940Flight Lieutenant Charles Palliser of No.249 Sqn RAF shot down a Do17
21October1940Hauptmann Dietrich Hrabak of II./Jagdgeschwader 54 was posthumously awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1940Hauptmann Heinz Bretntz of II./Jagdgeschwader 53 was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1940Hauptmann Walter Storp of II./Kampfgeschwader 76 was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1940Major Edgar Petersen of I./Kampfgeschwader 40 was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1940Major Joachim Hahn of Kampfgruppe 606 was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1940New Zealand Battle of Britain pilot, P/O W. S. Williams of 266 Squadron, was Killed.
21October1941Former Belgian Battle of Britain pilot, P/O V. M. M. Ortmans of 229 Squadron, was Taken prisoner.
21October1942Oberleutnant Hans Heindorff of Fern-Aufklrungs-Gruppe des OBdL was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1942Oberleutnant Iro Ilk of 1. (K)/Lehrgeschwader 1 was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1942Oberleutnant Josef Peteani of 7./Lehrgeschwader 2 was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1942Oberleutnant Josef Prentl of 1./Flak-Regiment 29 was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1942Oberstleutnant i.G. Torsten Christ of Chef des Generalstab VIII. Fliegerkorps was awarded the Knight's Cross
21October1958J Trollope, a WW1 Ace with 18.00 victories, died on this day
21October2000Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. D. Bisdee of 609 Squadron, Passed away.
21October2000Group Captain John Bisdee OBE DFC, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
21October2000John Bisdee, a WW2 Ace with 8.00 victories, died on this day

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