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Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC

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Joined the RAF in 1968. In 1971, he was posted to 44 Sqn at RAF Waddington as a Vulcan co-pilot, remaining there on 50 Sqn as a captain until 1976. After 3 years as a Jet Provost QFI at RAF Linton-on-Ouse, he returned to RAF Scampton as a QFI on the Vulcan Operational Conversion Unit. When the OCU closed, he moved again to RAF Waddington as Pilot Leader and Squadron QFI on 101 Sqn. The following year, during the Falklands War, he and his crew were selected to fly 2 of the 5 Black Buck missions. Martin Withers was the captain on XM607, the first Vulcan to bomb in anger during the Falklands War. On 1 May 1982, just one month after the Argentine invasion, Withers and his crew completed Black Buck One, the longest distance bombing mission in history until that time, and one of the most significant, attacking Port Stanley airfield during an 8,000 mile, 16 hour flight from their base at Ascension Island. for which he was awarded the DFC, with the other crewmembers being Mentioned in Dispatches. With the final demise of the Vulcan squadrons, he returned to No1 FTS at RAF Linton-on-Ouse, where he served as squadron commander and Deputy Chief Instructor, until leaving the RAF in 1991, having flown over 5500 hours (2000 on Vulcans). Since then he has accumulated a further 9500 hours on a variety of airliners, and is now flying the Boeing 767.


Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC

 The Falklands conflict led to the Vulcan being used for the first time in anger in 25 years of RAF service; 44, 50 and 101 Sqdn. aircraft were involved in Operation Corporate with five crews selected, two from 50 Sqdn., one each from 44 Sqdn. and 10......Corporate Prelude by Philip West.
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The Falklands conflict led to the Vulcan being used for the first time in anger in 25 years of RAF service; 44, 50 and 101 Sqdn. aircraft were involved in Operation Corporate with five crews selected, two from 50 Sqdn., one each from 44 Sqdn. and 10......NOT
AVAILABLE
 The Falklands conflict led to the Vulcan being used for the first time in anger in 25 years of RAF service; 44, 50 and 101 Sqdn. aircraft were involved in Operation Corporate with five crews selected, two from 50 Sqdn., one each from 44 Sqdn. and 10......Corporate Prelude by Philip West. (AP)
SOLD OUT
The Falklands conflict led to the Vulcan being used for the first time in anger in 25 years of RAF service; 44, 50 and 101 Sqdn. aircraft were involved in Operation Corporate with five crews selected, two from 50 Sqdn., one each from 44 Sqdn. and 10......NOT
AVAILABLE
......Corporate Prelude by Philip West. (B)
SOLD OUT
......NOT
AVAILABLE
 On the 30th April 1982, flying from Wideawake airfield on Ascension island, Flt. Lt. Martin Withers and his crew, flying RAF Vulcan (XM607) launched the first Black Buck bombing operation of the Falklands War.  There and back the non-stop flight cov......
Return to Ascension by Simon Atack.
Price : £105.00
On the 30th April 1982, flying from Wideawake airfield on Ascension island, Flt. Lt. Martin Withers and his crew, flying RAF Vulcan (XM607) launched the first Black Buck bombing operation of the Falklands War. There and back the non-stop flight cov......

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 The Vulcan B2  takes off from Ascension Island to play a major role in Operation Corporate, the name given to the British military operation to retake the Falkland Islands.  The Vulcan would take part in the seven planned bombing missions during the......
Falklands Bomber by Keith Aspinall. (B)
Price : £50.00
The Vulcan B2 takes off from Ascension Island to play a major role in Operation Corporate, the name given to the British military operation to retake the Falkland Islands. The Vulcan would take part in the seven planned bombing missions during the......

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Few aircraft have evoked such strong emotions with the airshow-going public as Vulcan XH558. Climbing almost vertically, with black smoke pouring from its thundering Olympus engines at full power, the Vulcan could bring any airshow to a complete stan......
Vulcan XH558, The Loved One by Michael Rondot.
Price : £80.00
Few aircraft have evoked such strong emotions with the airshow-going public as Vulcan XH558. Climbing almost vertically, with black smoke pouring from its thundering Olympus engines at full power, the Vulcan could bring any airshow to a complete stan......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC


Pack 555. Pack of two Vulcan bomber art prints by John Young and Michael Rondot.
Pack Price : £140.00
Saving : £108
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Lone Ranger by John Young.
Vulcan XH558, The Loved One by Michael Rondot.
RAF Vulcan MKB2 by Barry Price.

Quantity:

Pack 554. Pack of two RAF Vulcan bomber prints by John Young and Simon Atack.
Pack Price : £150.00
Saving : £108
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Lone Ranger by John Young.
Return to Ascension by Simon Atack.
RAF Vulcan MKB2 by Barry Price.

Quantity:
Pack 556. Pack of two Vulcan bomber prints by Geoff Lea and Simon Atack.
Pack Price : £135.00
Saving : £110
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Vulcan Sunset by Geoff Lea.
Return to Ascension by Simon Atack.

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Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC

Squadrons for : Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.100 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 12th July 1917

Sarang tebuan jangan dijolok - Never stir up a hornets nest

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.100 Sqn RAF

No.100 Sqn RAF

100 Squadron formed at Hingham, Norfolk on 23 February 1917, and moved to France a month later. On arrival it was issued with modified FE2B two-seat pushers biplanes and operations against aerodromes, railway stations and rail junctions commenced. On the night of 5/6 April 1917, when eleven FE2b aircraft attacked Douai airfield, where Manfred von Richthofen's 'Flying Circus' was based; Richthofen referred to this raid in his book, 'Der Rote Kampfflieger'. By the end of the year, No 100 in conjunction with No 55 Squadron, RFC and Naval 'A' Squadron had formed the nucleus of what was to become the Independent Force used for the strategic bombing of Germany with its Handley Page 0/400 heavy bombers. After the War, the unit remained on the continent for a year before transferring to Baldonnel in Ireland and re-equipping with Bristol Fighters. With the division of the island in 1922, the Squadron returned to England and bombing duties, this time with Vimys and DH9As. After the end of the war, the squadron remained on the continent until September 1919 as a cadre before transferring to RAF Baldonnel, near Dublin and re-forming to full strength, re-equipping with Bristol F.2 Fighters for army co-operation. Close air support operations were flown during the Irish War of Independence. Following the end of hostilities the squadron was moved to Spitalgate, Lincs. in February 1922 and converted to bombing, this time with Vickers Vimys and DH9As.[4] In May 1924, the unit flew Fairey Fawn. With these aircraft, In September of that year, the squadron took Hawker Horsley aircraft on complement and in November 1930 moved to Donibristle, Fife, converting to torpedo-bombing. and designated as 'No. 100 (Torpedo-Bomber) Squadron' in 1933. In November 1932, took delivery of Vickers Vildebeest and with this aircraft the squadron was deployed as part of the operation to defend Singapore, arriving at Seletar in January 1934. ancient aircraft stood little chance of stopping the Japanese advance, and eventually the Squadron, and its sister Vildebeest unit, No 36, had been decimated. On 15 December 1942, No 100 Squadron reformed at Waltham as a night-time heavy bomber squadron and was part of No. 1 Group, RAF Bomber Command. In January 1943, the squadron received the first of its new complement of Avro Lancasters; the first operation of the squadron was on 4 March 1943 against a U-Boat base at St Nazaire. A few days later the squadron was involved in a raid against Nuremberg in Germany and from then on, in support of Bomber Command's strategic role against Germany, took part in every major raid. At the end of 1943, the squadron had completed the second largest number of successful operations of units within No. 1 Group Bomber Command and had the lowest 'loss' rate. On the night of 16/17 December 1943, the squadron received orders to attack Berlin. The raid became known as 'Black Thursday' as Bomber Command lost 25 aircraft on the raid and 28 in crashes at fog-shrouded airfields Surviving the post-war defence cuts and moving to Malaya to join Operation Firedog with its Lincolns during 1950. Four years later, No 100 moved to Kenya during the Mau Mau uprising, before returning to England and converting to the Canberra. The Canberras were used for trials work in conjunction with British nuclear tests in the Pacific, before disbanding again in 1959. Reformed at Wittering as part of the V-Force until September 1968 following withdrawal of the Blue Steel stand-off weapon. No 100 Squadron returned to Canberra flying when it was reformed at West Raynham in February 1972, this time to provide target towing facilities for RAF fighter squadrons, later undertaking specialist electronic warfare training before the Canberras were finally retired at the end of 1991 and replaced by the Hawk. With the closure of its base, RAF Wyton, the unit moved to Finningley, relocating to Leeming in 1995 100 Squadron now operates in a mixed target facilities role along with exercise and training support which include WSO training, and dedicated aircraft to support the Joint Forward Air Controllers Training and Standards Unit.

No.44 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th April 1916
Fate : Disbanded 21st December 1982
Rhodesia

Fulmina regis justa - The Kings thunderbolts are righteous

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.44 Sqn RAF

No.44 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.50 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th May 1916
Fate : Disbanded 31st March 1984

From defence to attack

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.50 Sqn RAF

No.50 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC
A list of all aircraft associated with Squadron Leader Martin Withers, DFC. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Vulcan



Click the name above to see prints featuring Vulcan aircraft.

Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1955

Vulcan

The Avro Vulcan was the worlds first delta winged heavy bomber. the first prototype flew on the 30th August 1952 and the first production Vulcan flew in February 1955. The first Avro Vulcan's arrived for service with the Royal Air Force with 230 operational Conversion Unit (OCU) at RAF Finningley in May 1956. with the first squadron to receive the Vulcan in July 1957 was 83 squadron. In April 1968 Bomber Command merged into the Newly created Strike Command with eight Squadrons being equipped with Vulcan's. A terrain Hugging variant was introduced (the Vulcan SR2) in 1973, to all squadrons except no. 27 squadron (Flying Elephants) which was a Maritime reconnaissance Sqd. The Last Major role for the Avro Bomber was the bombing of Argentinean Airfields in the Falkland Islands During The Falklands Conflict The Avro Vulcan high Altitude Bomber with a crew of five. Top Speed 650 mph with a ceiling of 60,000 feet. maximum range of 5750 miles (with in flight refuelling). with a conventional bomb load of 21 x 1000 lb bombs

Aviation History Timeline : 18th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
18December1941Feldwebel Gerhard Kppen of 7./Jagdgeschwader 52 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1941Hauptmann Theodor Triebe of 1./Flak-Regiment 7 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1941Oberleutnant Matthias Schwegler of I./Kampfgeschwader 51 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1944Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O D. M. Crook of 609 Squadron, was Killed.
18December1959Gerald Maxwell, a WW1 Ace with 21.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Hans Hahn, a WW2 Ace with 108.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Hans Rudel, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
18December1982Hans-Ulrich Rudel, a WW2 Ace with 11.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Knight's Cross recipient Hans-Ulrich Rudel of 9./Sturzkampfgeschwader 2 died on this day
18December2007Lawrence ONeill, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
18December2008Air Commodore Peter Brothers CBE, DSO, DFC*, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
18December2008Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/Lt. P. M. Brothers of 32 & 257 Squadrons, Passed away.
18December2008Peter Brothers, a WW2 Ace with 15.00 victories, died on this day

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