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Air Vice-Marshal John Howe CB CBE AFC (deceased)

John Howe flew Spitfires, Mustangs and Vampires With the South African Air Force and F-5lD Mustang fighter bombers in the Korean War before joining the RAF 'to fly Hunters'. He commanded the first RAF Lightning squadron when No.74 Sqn converted from Hunters to Lightnings in 1960, and led the famous No.74 Sqn 'Tigers' nine-ship Lightning aerobatic team. He has flown all the legendary USAF 'century series' fighters, and later commanded the F-4 Phantom OCU and RAF Gutersloh. John Frederick George Howe was born in East London, South Africa, on March 26th 1930 and educated at St Andrew's College, Grahamstown. As soon as he left school, he joined the South African Air Force and trained as a pilot. In early 1951 he joined No 2 Squadron, known as the Flying Cheetahs, which was based in South Korea as part of the United Nations forces. The squadron, equipped with the piston-engine Mustang, was heavily engaged in the ground attack role in support of the Army. On June 24th, Howe took off with three others. They responded to an emergency call for air support by a surrounded ground force. In the face of intense anti-aircraft fire, the four Mustangs attacked gun emplacements a number of times. Howe did not expect to survive, but the four aircraft returned to base. All four pilots received US gallantry awards. A month later, Howe was forced to crash land and was rescued by a helicopter. In September, as a 21-year-old second lieutenant, he was the leader of four aircraft instructed to attack enemy troops that were threatening friendly forces. Fierce enemy fire damaged Howe's aircraft but he continued to lead his formation against the target. The US authorities awarded him an immediate DFC, the citation recording: He displayed a standard of leadership above and beyond that normally expected. After completing his flying tour, Howe remained in Korea as a forward air controller before returning to South Africa. At the end of 1954 he travelled to Britain to join the RAF. In April 1956 he joined No 222 (Natal) Squadron flying the Hunter. When a volunteer was required for forward air controller duties with No 3 Commando Brigade in late 1956, Howe's experience in Korea helped to land him the job. He sailed with the Brigade for the ill-fated Suez campaign and, at dawn on November 6th, landed on the beaches at Port Said with No 40 Commando, to direct aircraft on to targets in the area. In the event, the campaign was short-lived. Howe returned to his squadron before joining No 43 Squadron as a flight commander, still flying the Hunter. He was awarded a Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, receiving a second two years later. In June 1959 he started training to take command of his Lightning squadron. Howe remained in the fighter business, including a tour of duty with the USAF which gave him an opportunity to fly the latest American fighters, including the Phantom. He has flown all the legendary USAF 'century series' fighters. In 1968 he was appointed to command the RAF's operational conversion unit that saw the introduction of the Phantom into RAF service, his unit being responsible for the conversion of the first squadron crews. After a staff tour he became the station commander of RAF Gutersloh, the home of two Lightning squadrons and a support helicopter squadron. His fighter squadrons, based a few minutes' flying time from the border with Warsaw Pact forces, mounted a continuous quick-reaction capability. He rarely missed an opportunity to maintain his fighter pilot proficiency. After attending the Royal College of Defence Studies he served at HQ 11 (Fighter) Group, and on promotion to air commodore was appointed the commandant of the Royal Observer Corps (ROC). The organisation had a fine record, but Howe justifiably believed that it was in need of modernisation and a more robust attitude. With his usual, not always popular, vigour, he set about applying the same exacting standards to the ROC that he did to his flying. By the time he left in 1980, the efficiency of the Corps had risen sharply. In May 1980 he was appointed the air officer commanding the Southern Maritime Region, a departure from his previous fighter experience and where his usual forceful approach was much in evidence. His final appointment in the RAF was the dual role of Commandant General RAF Regiment and Provost Marshal of the RAF. He retired in November 1985. He was appointed CB (1985) and CBE (1978). Air Vice-Marshal John Howe died January 27th 2016.



Items Signed by Air Vice-Marshal John Howe CB CBE AFC (deceased)

Of all the classic fighters to have served with the RAF since the l950s, no other aircraft had the raw power and breathtaking performance of the Lightning, and of all the variants the F2A was considered to be the best.......
Lightning Thunder by Michael Rondot.
Price : £75.00
Of all the classic fighters to have served with the RAF since the l950s, no other aircraft had the raw power and breathtaking performance of the Lightning, and of all the variants the F2A was considered to be the best.......

Quantity:
Of all the classic fighters to have served with the RAF since the l950s, no other aircraft had the raw power and breathtaking performance of the Lightning, and of all the variants the F2A was considered to be the best.......
Lightning Thunder by Michael Rondot (AP)
Price : £120.00
Of all the classic fighters to have served with the RAF since the l950s, no other aircraft had the raw power and breathtaking performance of the Lightning, and of all the variants the F2A was considered to be the best.......

Quantity:
This classic portrayal of 92 squadrons flagship Lightning F2A XN778 King Cobra taking off from a rain-swept RAF Gutersloh in 1977 pays tribute to the legendary fighter,its pilots and the engineers who enjoyed a love/hate relationship with the difficu......Lightning by Michael Rondot.
SOLD OUT
This classic portrayal of 92 squadrons flagship Lightning F2A XN778 King Cobra taking off from a rain-swept RAF Gutersloh in 1977 pays tribute to the legendary fighter,its pilots and the engineers who enjoyed a love/hate relationship with the difficu......NOT
AVAILABLE
This classic portrayal of 92 squadrons flagship Lightning F2A XN778 King Cobra taking off from a rain-swept RAF Gutersloh in 1977 pays tribute to the legendary fighter,
its pilots and the engineers who enjoyed a love/hate relationship with the diffi......Lightning by Michael Rondot (AP)
Price : £120.00
This classic portrayal of 92 squadrons flagship Lightning F2A XN778 King Cobra taking off from a rain-swept RAF Gutersloh in 1977 pays tribute to the legendary fighter, its pilots and the engineers who enjoyed a love/hate relationship with the diffi......

Quantity:
This classic portrayal of 92 squadrons flagship Lightning F2A XN778 King Cobra taking off from a rain-swept RAF Gutersloh in 1977 pays tribute to the legendary fighter,
its pilots and the engineers who enjoyed a love/hate relationship with the diffi......Lightning by Michael Rondot (B)
SOLD OUT
This classic portrayal of 92 squadrons flagship Lightning F2A XN778 King Cobra taking off from a rain-swept RAF Gutersloh in 1977 pays tribute to the legendary fighter, its pilots and the engineers who enjoyed a love/hate relationship with the diffi......NOT
AVAILABLE
 Life on the flightline at Royal Air Force Coltishall with the 41 Squadron engineering line building in the background. Coltishall was the last Royal Air Force station to operate three squadrons of aircraft from flightlines in front of squadron hanga......
Coltishall - End of the Line by Michael Rondot. (AP)
Price : £120.00
Life on the flightline at Royal Air Force Coltishall with the 41 Squadron engineering line building in the background. Coltishall was the last Royal Air Force station to operate three squadrons of aircraft from flightlines in front of squadron hanga......

Quantity:

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Air Vice-Marshal John Howe CB CBE AFC (deceased)

Air Vice-Marshal John Howe CB CBE AFC (deceased)

Squadrons for : Air Vice-Marshal John Howe CB CBE AFC (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Air Vice-Marshal John Howe CB CBE AFC (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.74 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st July 1917
Trinidad

I fear no man

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.74 Sqn RAF

No.74 Sqn RAF

Hurricane of 56 Squadron was shot down by mistake by No. 74 Squadron and Pilot Officer M L Halton-Harrop of 56 sqd was killed on the 6th September 1939
Aircraft for : Air Vice-Marshal John Howe CB CBE AFC (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Air Vice-Marshal John Howe CB CBE AFC (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Hunter

Click the name above to see prints featuring Hunter aircraft.

Manufacturer : Hawker
Retired : 1971
Number Built : 1972

Hunter

Hawker Hunter F-1 to Fr-10 jet fighter and fighter reconnaissance aircraft first flew with No43 squadron Royal Air Force in July 1954. The Hawker Hunter continued service until 1971. The Hunters were used by two RAF display units, the Black Arrows of No. 111 Squadron who set a record by looping and barrel rolling in formation 22 Hunters, and later the Blue Diamonds of 92 Squadron that used 16 Hunters. A total of 1,972 Hunters were produced by Hawker Siddeley and under licence.

Lightning (UK)



Click the name above to see prints featuring Lightning (UK) aircraft.

Manufacturer : BAC
Production Began : 1959
Retired : 1988
Number Built : 278

Lightning (UK)

English Electric (later BAC) Lightning. Originally designed by W F Petter (the designer of the Canberra) The first Lighting Prototype was first flown on the 4th August 1954 by Wing Commander R P Beamont at Boscombe Down. The second prototype P1A, The name of Lightning was not used until 1958) (WG763) was shown at the Farnborough show in September 1955. The Third prototype was flown in April 1957 and was the first British aircraft ever to fly at Mach 2 on the 25th November 1958 The first production aircraft made its first flight on 3rd November 1959 and entered operational service with the RAF on the 29th June 1960with |NO. 74 squadron based at Coltishall. The F1 was followed shortly after by the F1A which had been modified to carry a in-flight refueling probe. The Lightning F2 entered service in December 1962 with no 19 and 92 squadrons. a total of 44 aircraft F2 were built. The F3 came into service between 1964 and 1966 with Fighter Command squadrons, re engined with the Roll's Royce Avon 301 turbojets. The Lightning T Mk 5 was a training version Lightning a total of 22 were built between August 1964 and December 1966. The BAC Lighting F MK 6 was the last variant of the lightning, base don the F3, this was the last single seat fighter and served the |Royal Air Force for 20 years. First Flown on 17th April 1964, and a total of 55 F6 saw service with the Royal Air Force, and the last Lightning F6 was produced in August 1967. A Total of 278 lightning's of all marks were delivered. In 1974 the Phantom aircraft began replacing the aging Lightning's, but 2 F6 remained in service up to 1988 with Strike Command until finally being replaced with Tornado's. Specifications for MK1 to 4: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston and Samlesbury Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.1 (1390 mph) at 36,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. Specificaitons for MK 6: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.27 (1500 mph) at 40,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Range: 800 miles. Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. or Two Red Top. or two retractable contain 24 spin-stabilized rockets each.

Mustang



Click the name above to see prints featuring Mustang aircraft.

Manufacturer : North American

Mustang

The ubiquitous North American P-51 Mustang, which many consider to be the best all-around fighter of WW II, owes its origins to the British Air Ministry. Following Britains entry into WW II in 1939, the RAF was interested in purchasing additional fighter aircraft from American sources, particularly the Curtiss P-40. Curtiss, which was busy, was unable to guarantee timely delivery so the British approached North American Aviation as a possible second source for the P-40. North American chose to propose its own fighter design which would use the same Allison engine as the P-40. Utilizing new laminar flow wings, the North American fighter was expected to have performance better than the P-40. Developed in record time the new aircraft was designated as a Mustang I by the Brits, whereas the USAAF ordered two for evaluation which were designated XP-51 Apaches. Intrigued with the possibility of using this aircraft also as a dive bomber, North American proposed this to the USAAF which decided to order 500 of the P-51 aircraft to be modified for dive bombing use. Designated as the A-36 Invader, this version of the Mustang utilized dive flaps, and bomb racks under each wing. Some reinforcing of the structural members was also required because of the G-forces to be encountered in dive bombing. A-36s entered combat service with the USAAF prior to any P-51s. In early 1943 the 86th and 27th Fighter Bomber Groups of the 12th Air Force began flying A-36s out of Northern Africa. Despite some early problems with instability caused by the dive flaps, the A-36 was effective in light bombing and strafing roles. It was not, however, capable of dog fighting with German fighters, especially at higher altitudes. Despite these drawbacks one USAAF pilot, Captain Michael T. Russo, who served with the 16th Bomb Squadron of the 27th Fighter Bomber Group, was credited with five confirmed aerial victories in the A-36, thereby becoming the first mustang ace.

Phantom

Click the name above to see prints featuring Phantom aircraft.

Manufacturer : McDonnell Douglas
Production Began : 1960
Retired : 1992
Number Built : 5195

Phantom

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber produced for the U.S. Navy by Mcdonnell Douglas. It became a major part of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and American Air Force. The Phantom F-4 saw service with all American forces during the Vietnam war serving as a fighter and ground attack aircraft. The Phantom first saw service in 1960 but continued in service until the 1980s (being replaced by the F-15 and F-16 ) The last Phantoms saw service during the Gulf war in 1991 being used for reconnaissance. Other nations also used the Phantom to great success. The Israeli Air Force used them during various Arab-Israeli wars and the Phantom also saw service in the Iranian Air Force during the Iran Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built. The Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy flew versions based on the F-4. The British Phantoms were powered by Rolls Royce Spey engines and also received British avionics, under the names pf Phantom FG.1 and Phantom FGR.2. The last British Phantoms served with 74 Squadron until they were dispanded in 1992.

Spitfire



Click the name above to see prints featuring Spitfire aircraft.

Manufacturer : Supermarine
Production Began : 1936
Retired : 1948
Number Built : 20351

Spitfire

Royal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

Vampire

Click the name above to see prints featuring Vampire aircraft.


Vampire

Full profile not yet available.

Aviation History Timeline : 14th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
14December1940 of No.112 Sqn RAF shot down a SM79
14December1940 of No.112 Sqn RAF shot down a SM79
14December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O K. J. Marston of 56 Squadron, was Killed.
14December1940Hauptmann Joachim Schlichting of Gruppenkommandeur of the III./Jagdgeschwader 27 was awarded the Knight's Cross
14December1940Hauptmann Waldemar Plewig of II./Sturzkampfgeschwader 77 was awarded the Knight's Cross
14December1940Oberleutnant Franz Baron von Werra of II./Jagdgeschwader 3 was awarded the Knight's Cross
14December1940Oberleutnant Karl Barth of 3./Kstenflieger-Gruppe 506 was awarded the Knight's Cross
14December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. T. L. French of 29 Squadron, was Killed.
14December1942Heinrich Krafft, a WW2 Ace with 78.00 victories, died on this day
14December1944Hans-Joachim Birkner, a WW2 Ace with 117.00 victories, died on this day
14December1944Knight's Cross recipient Hans-Joachim Birkner of 9./Jagdgeschwader 52 died on this day
14December2008Robert Abernathy, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day

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