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Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased)

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Qualifying as an Observer in 1941, Ron joined 144 Squadron on Hamdens before transferring to 44 Squadron at Waddington as a Navigator on Lancasters. At the end of the 1942 he moved to Marham, converting to Mosquitos, and in 1943 was posted to 109 Squadron equipped with Oboe as part of the Pathfinder Force. He flew 104 Oboe operations and 139 ops in total, and was widely credited with helping advance development of the Oboe system.


Awarded the Distinguished Service OrderAwarded the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Service Order
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased)

 Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Commands Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfin......Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (AP)
Price : £135.00
Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Commands Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfin......

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 Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Commands Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfin......Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
Price : £120.00
Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Commands Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfin......

Quantity:
 Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Commands Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfin......Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (C)
Price : £265.00
Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Commands Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfin......

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Up to 1942 Bomber Command operations were beset by many problems. The means they had to accurately pinpoint the target and assault it were totally lacking, in fact their Commander in Chief, Air Marshall Arthur Harris later wrote : It was glaringly ob......
Winter Ops by Gerald Coulson (B)
Price : £595.00
Up to 1942 Bomber Command operations were beset by many problems. The means they had to accurately pinpoint the target and assault it were totally lacking, in fact their Commander in Chief, Air Marshall Arthur Harris later wrote : It was glaringly ob......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased)



Mosquito Cres Tribute Aviation Print Pack.
Pack Price : £280.00
Saving : £342
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
Night Intruder by Robert Taylor.
Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (E)
A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman.
Sunday Afternoon by Geoffrey R Herickx.
Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes.

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Pack 509. Pack of two WW2 De Havelland Mosquito prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
Pack Price : £210.00
Saving : £277
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
Mosquitos at Dusk by Nicolas Trudgian.
Sunday Afternoon by Geoffrey R Herickx.
Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes.

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Pilot Signed Mosquito Aircraft Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £180.00
Saving : £167
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman.
Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes.

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RAF Mosquito Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Anthony Saunders.
Pack Price : £160.00
Saving : £102
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (E)
Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes.

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Mosquito Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor.
Pack Price : £185.00
Saving : £92
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
Night Intruder by Robert Taylor.
Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes.

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De Havilland Mosquito Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £145.00
Saving : £82
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
A Moments Peace by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes.

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Special Sale Pack of 5 Prints - 4 FREE!
Pack Price : £145.00
Saving : £205
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (AP)
The Struggle for Malta by Ivan Berryman. (F)
LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Dinah Might by Ivan Berryman.

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Robert Taylor Mosquito Aircraft Print Pack
Pack Price : £165.00
Saving : £95
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Mosquito into Attack by Robert Taylor
Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)

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Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased)

Squadrons for : Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.109 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st November 1917
Fate : Disbanded 1st February 1957

Primi hastati - The first of the legion

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.109 Sqn RAF

No.109 Sqn RAF

The squadron first formed on 1 November 1917 as 109 Squadron Royal Flying Corps at South Carlton and began training on the de Havilland DH.9 bomber but was disbanded on 19 August 1918 without becoming operational On 10th December 1940, the squadron was re-born from the Wireless Intelligence Development Unit (WIDU) whose headquarters were at Boscombe Down, Wilts. Using Anson and Wellington aircraft it was engaged during the next two years in development of radio counter-measures and also new radar aids, notably the blind bombing system known as Oboe. In August, 1942, No. 109 moved to Wyton to become one of the original units of the Pathfinder Force.1 In December it converted to Oboe Mosquitoes and on 2Oth/21st made World War 2 history by flying the first Oboe sorties over enemy territory - on a calibration raid against a power station at Lutterade in Holland. Eight nights later, on 31st December/1st January 1943, it made history again when it pioneered Oboe target marking for a following force of heavy bombers; the target was Dsseldorf. The squadron remained an Oboe Mosquito marker unit for the rest of the war and from mid-1943 had a friendly PFF rival in No. 105 Squadron. One of No. 109's most outstanding successes was on 5/6th March, 1943, when eight of its Mosquitoes led Bomber Command's devastating assault on Essen which laid waste more than 160 acres of that city and heralded the Battle of the Ruhr. Included among the squadron's many other wartime claims to fame is the claim that the last bombs to be dropped on Berlin were dropped by one of its Mosquitos at 2.14am on 21st April, 1945. On 30 September 1945 the Squadron was disbanded. Among the scores of decorations won by No. 109 Squadron personnel was a Victoria Cross. It was awarded posthumously to Squadron Leader BAM Palmer, "in recognition of most conspicuous bravery" while flying a Lancaster of No. 582 Squadron (mainly with a 582 Squadron crew) and acting as Oboe leader of a Lancaster force against Cologne on 23rd December 1944. On 1 October 1945, No. 627 Squadron at Woodhall Spa was renumbered 109 Squadron and flew Mosquitoes as a target marking unit until conversion to Canberras began in July 1952. It eventually re-equipped with Canberras and saw action in the Suez campaign. With the increase of the V bomber force the squadron was no longer needed and was finally disbanded on 1 February 1957 at RAF Binbrook.

No.144 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 20th March 1918
Fate : Disbanded 23rd August 1963

Who shall stop us

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.144 Sqn RAF

No.144 Sqn RAF

No 144 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Port Said, Egypt, on 2Oth March 1918. On 14th August it came under the orders of the Palestine Brigade, Royal Air Force, and by the end of the month it had been fully equipped as a bombing squadron with DH9s at Junction Station. On the opening of the final offensive in Palestine, No 144 Squadron was with the 4Oth (Army) Wing and had 13 DH9s on charge. There was no special air activity before the offensive so that the enemy should not be warned of our intentions, but No. 144 Squadron made two important bombing raids on Der'a station in conjunction with the operations of the Arab Northern Army under Sherif Feisal and Colonel TE Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) in the eastern area on the 16th and 17th September. When the offensive began on the coastal sector on 19th September an initial bombing offensive was directed against the main Turkish telegraphic and telephonic centres whose positions were known from intelligence sources and from air photographs. No 144 Squadron bombed the central telephone exchange at El 'Affule and the headquarters and telephone exchange of the Turkish Seventh Army at Nablus, and (it seems) effectively cut the enemy's telephone communications at a vital time. By 20th September the enemy was in headlong retreat. In the west the Turkish Eighth Army had been shattered and its remnants, together with the Seventh Army in the centre, were retiring to their doom. On the following day they were trapped in the Wadi el Far'a and completely wiped out by air attack with all RAF squadrons being concentrated in the attack. No 144 Squadron then co-operated in the advance east of the Jordan, which resulted in the capture of the Turkish Fourth Army. At the end of September a flight of No 144 Squadron was stationed at Haifa to co-operate with the XXI Corps during its advance on Beirut, but elsewhere, with the rapid pursuit of the enemy, the opportunities and facilities for bombing had diminished. In October the squadron moved to Mudros, Greece, but by the end of the year it had returned to England. It was disbanded at Ford Junction on 4th February 1919. The squadron was still equipped with Hampdens on the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939, flying its first mission on 26 September, when it dispatched 12 aircraft to search for, and attack if found, German naval forces in the North Sea. On this occasion, however, it encountered no allowable targets. Three days later, the squadron sent out 11 aircraft over the Heligoland Bight in another search for German warships. The strike force split into two groups; while one formation spotted but failed to hit two German destroyers, the second formation was intercepted by Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters, which shot down all five Hampdens. The first occasion on which No 144 Squadron flew over the German mainland was the night of 24/25th February 1940, when propaganda leaflets or Nickels were dropped on Hamburg. On 6th March, by which time it had Nickelled several other German towns and by which time also it had flown a number of security patrols, the squadron took part in Bomber Command's first attack on a German land objective - the minelaying-seaplane base at Hornum. Just over two months later (by which time minelaying had been added to its duties) No 144 shared in another notable "first" - the first big bombing attack on the German mainland (the exits of Mnchen-Gladbach). As a result of the Channel Dash in February 1942, when the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen managed to break the British blockade and sail from France through the English Channel to Germany, indicated to the RAF that their anti-shipping strike strength was inadequate, and it was decided to convert two Hampden squadrons to the torpedo bomber role, with 144 Squadron being one of the two chosen for conversion.[10] The squadron transferred from Bomber Command to 18 Group Coastal Command on 21 April 1942, moving to RAF Leuchars on the East coast of Scotland. It flew its first torpedo bomber mission on 27 July 1942. ] In September 1942, 32 Hampdens of 144 Squadron and 455 Squadron RAAF were sent to Murmansk in Northern Russia in order to support the Arctic convoy PQ 18, and to attack any German warships that might sortie from bases in Norway against the convoy. The squadron lost 5 Hampdens on the flight to Russia, with a further four of 455 Squadron's also lost. The German surface warships did not attack PQ 18, and the squadron's personnel returned to Britain aboard a cruiser in October, leaving its aircraft behind to be handed over to the Soviets. In January 1943 the Squadron converted to the more capable Bristol Beaufighter, staying in the torpedo bomber role. After working up, it transferred to Algeria in June 1943, flying anti-shipping strikes over the Mediterranean until it returned to the United Kingdom in August. It continued anti-shipping operations over the North Sea from RAF Wick in Scotland, moving to RAF Davidstow Moor in Cornwall in May 1944 in preparation for Operation Overlord, the Allied invasion of Normandy, where it was tasked with protecting the invasion forces from German E-boats. It moved to RAF Strubby in Lincolnshire in July for operations against E-boats and German convoys off the Dutch coast. In September it moved to Banff, Aberdeenshireas part of the Banff Strike Wing, for operations off Norway. In January 1945, the squadron abandoned the torpedo role, concentrating in anti-flak suppression for the Strike Wing. It disbanded on 25 May 1945 at RAF Dallach

No.44 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th April 1916
Fate : Disbanded 21st December 1982
Rhodesia

Fulmina regis justa - The Kings thunderbolts are righteous

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.44 Sqn RAF

No.44 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Squadron Leader Ron Curtis DSO DFC (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Hampden



Click the name above to see prints featuring Hampden aircraft.

Manufacturer : Handley Page
Retired : 1942
Number Built : 1500

Hampden

The Handley Page HP.52 Hampden was a twin-engine medium bomber built for the Royal Air Force and was used by Bomber Command in the early years of world war two. Along with the other medium bombers the Whitley and Wellington, the Hampden bore the brunt of the early bombing war over Europe, taking part in the first night raid on Berlin and the first 1,000-plane raid on Cologne. The newest of the three medium bombers, the Hampden was known as the Flying Suitcase because of its cramped crew conditions. A total of 226 Hampdens were in service with eight Royal Air Force squadrons by the start of the Second World War. Despite its speed and agility, in operational use the Hampden was no match for the fighters of the Luftwaffe (ME109 and FW 190) and the Hampdens role as a day bomber was brief, but Hampdens continued to operate at night on bombing raids over Germany and in mine laying (code-named gardening) in the North Sea. Almost half of the Hampdens built 714, were lost on operations, witht he loss of 1,077 crew killed and another 739 missing. German flak accounted for 108; with one Hampden being lost due to German Barrage balloons; 263 Hampdens crashed due to a variety of causes, and 214 others were classed as missing. Luftwaffe pilots claimed 128 Hampdens, shooting down 92 at night. The Hampden soon became obsolete for its roll as a medium modern bomber, after operating mainly at night, it was retired from Bomber Command service in late 1942. but continued with Coastal Command throughout 1943 as a long-range Torpedo Bomber (the Hampden TB Mk I which carried the Mk XII torpedo in an open bomb-bay and a single 500lb (230kg) bomb under each wing) The Hampden was also used by the Royal Canadian Air Force and Royal New Zealand Air Force.

Lancaster



Click the name above to see prints featuring Lancaster aircraft.

Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1942
Retired : 1963
Number Built : 7377

Lancaster

The Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' Operation Gomorrah in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.

Mosquito



Click the name above to see prints featuring Mosquito aircraft.

Manufacturer : De Havilland
Production Began : 1940
Retired : 1955
Number Built : 7781

Mosquito

Used as a night fighter, fighter bomber, bomber and Photo-reconnaissance, with a crew of two, Maximum speed was 425 mph, at 30,300 feet, 380mph at 17,000ft. and a ceiling of 36,000feet, maximum range 3,500 miles. the Mosquito was armed with four 20mm Hospano cannon in belly and four .303 inch browning machine guns in nose. Coastal strike aircraft had eight 3-inch Rockets under the wings, and one 57mm shell gun in belly. The Mossie at it was known made its first flight on 25th November 1940, and the mosquito made its first operational flight for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance unit based at Benson. In early 1942, a modified version (mark II) operated as a night fighter with 157 and 23 squadron's. In April 1943 the first De Haviland Mosquito saw service in the Far east and in 1944 The Mosquito was used at Coastal Command in its strike wings. Bomber Commands offensive against Germany saw many Mosquitos, used as photo Reconnaissance aircraft, Fighter Escorts, and Path Finders. The Mosquito stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1955. and a total of 7781 mosquito's were built.

Aviation History Timeline : 12th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O A. W. N. Britton of 263 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. H. Harrison of 145 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O W. H. DFM & Bar Franklin of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, S/L G. W. Montagu of 236 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. M. H. Hine of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. R. S. Hutton of 85 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. R. V. Hogg of 616 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. J. F. H. Bandinel of 3 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. K. Pollard of 232 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former Canadian Battle of Britain pilot, P/O A. L. Edy of 602 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former Polish Battle of Britain pilot, F/O B. Groszewski of 43 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O G. Ashfield of F.I.U., was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O G. A. Denby of 600 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. C. R. Hewlett of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former Canadian Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt E. G. Ford of 3 and 232 Squadrons, was Killed.
12December1944Alexander Preinfalk, a WW2 Ace with 76.00 victories, died on this day
12December1944Knight's Cross recipient Alexander Preinfalk of 5./Jagdgeschwader 77 died on this day
12December1945William Tipton, a WW1 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
12December2006Knight's Cross recipient Hans-Karl Stepp of 7./Sturzkampfgeschwader 2 died on this day
12December2006Oberstleutnant Hans-Karl Stepp, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
12December2006Wing Commander R C Dick Cresswell, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
12December2007Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O E. G. Barwell of 264 & 242 Squadrons, Passed away.
12December2007Joe Robbins, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
12December2007Wing Commander Eric Barwell, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day

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