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Squadron Leader Hedley Hazelden DFC* (deceased)

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Hedley was born in 1915 at Sevenoaks, Kent. Leaving school in 1933 he joined Standard Life. In November 1938 he joined the RAFVR and in June 1939 he reported to 6 E and RFTS at Sywell where he began his flying career on the Tiger Moth later moving to Redhill flying Hinds, Harts and Audax. Called to full time service on the day before war was declared in September 1939 and after brief training at Cambridge University he was posted to 12 SFTS at RAF Spittlegate flying Ansons. Moving to 14 OTU at RAF Cottesmore he converted to the Hampden before being posted to 44 (Rhodesia) Squadron at RAF Waddington early in 1940. He was commissioned in December 1940. April 1940 saw the end of his tour with 43 operations to his credit and a Distinguished Flying Cross. Back to RAF Cottesmore for 6 months as an instructor on 14 OTU then to RAF Finingley with 25 OTU for conversion to the Manchester and crewing. Christmas 1941 saw him posted to RAF Scampton with 83 Squadron flying the Manchester before converting to the Lancaster. His first Lancaster operation was the thousand bomber raid on Cologne. After 22 operations and a bar to his DFC he was posted to RAF Bassingborn 11 OTU as an instructor. He moved to RAF Oakley as Station Commander with 39 Wellington 1cs of 11 OTU. His rank by this time was Squadron Leader. In June 1943 he joined the newly formed Test Pilots School at RAF Boscombe Down. Of the 18 who started the No.1 Course Headley was one of the 13 who passed in January 1944. After spending a month at Avro at Woodford production testing Lancasters he joined the Heavy Test Squadron A and AEE as its commanding officer in which time he flew every heavy bomber type before it entered RAF service. Following the end of the war he commanded the newly formed large civil aircraft squadron. He move to Handley Page in April 1947 as Cheif Test Pilot working on the Hastings and Hermes. He was a development consultant on the Victor, eventually taking it on its maiden flight on Christmas Eve 1952. Many Victor flights followed and he flew the maiden flight of the Herald on the 15th of August 1955. Headley left Handley Page in 1966, and having gained his civil licence he flew Heralds for Autair International and BAC-111s for Court Line. He finally retired in January 1981. He died in August 2001.


Awarded the Distinguished Flying CrossAwarded a Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Flying Cross
Bar to the
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Squadron Leader Hedley Hazelden DFC* (deceased)

 The Handley Page Victor was developed and produced by the Handley Page Aircraft Company, which served during the Cold War. It was the third and final of the V-bombers operated by the Royal Air Force , the other two V-bombers being the Avro Vulcan an......
Victor by Keith Aspinall. (B)
Price : £50.00
The Handley Page Victor was developed and produced by the Handley Page Aircraft Company, which served during the Cold War. It was the third and final of the V-bombers operated by the Royal Air Force , the other two V-bombers being the Avro Vulcan an......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Squadron Leader Hedley Hazelden DFC* (deceased)

Squadron Leader Hedley Hazelden DFC* (deceased)

Squadrons for : Squadron Leader Hedley Hazelden DFC* (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Squadron Leader Hedley Hazelden DFC* (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.44 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 15th April 1916
Fate : Disbanded 21st December 1982
Rhodesia

Fulmina regis justa - The Kings thunderbolts are righteous

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No.44 Sqn RAF

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No.83 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th January 1917
Fate : Disbanded 31st August 1969

Strike to defend

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No.83 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Squadron Leader Hedley Hazelden DFC* (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Squadron Leader Hedley Hazelden DFC* (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Anson

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Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1968
Number Built : 11020

Anson

he Avro Anson originated from the Avro 652 commercial aircraft which first flew on 7th January 1935. It was a twin-engine British-built multi-role aircraft which saw distinctive service with both the Royal Air Force and The Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm as well as The Royal Canadian Air Force during and after the Second World War. The prototype 652A first flew at Woodford on 7th January 1935 and was developed from an initial airliner design and named after Admiral George Anson. The adaptation for a coastal reconnaissance role resulted in the production variant, the Avro 652a, which flew at Woodford on New Years Eve 1935 with the type entering service in March 1936 as the Anson Mk1. Initially it was flown with a 3-man crew but later developments in its reconnaissance role required a 4th crew member. The Anson entered service on 6 March 1936 with 48 Squadron equipped with the Anson. At the start of the Second World War, the RAF had received 824 Ansons and there were 26 RAF squadrons operating the Anson I: 10 with Coastal Command and 16 with Bomber Command. All of the squadrons in Bomber Command in 1939 with Anson Is were operational training squadrons that prepared crews for frontline service. 12 of the squadrons were in No. 6 (Operational Training) Group. Newly formed crews having completed individual flying and technical training were first trained as bomber crews in Ansons and then advanced to the various frontline aircraft types, which were also in the same squadrons with the Ansons. After training in the frontline aircraft type, crews would advance to the frontline bomber squadrons with those aircraft types (Fairey Battle, Bristol Blenheim, Vickers Wellington, Armstrong Whitworth Whitley, and Handley-Page Hampden). At the start of the war, the Lockheed Hudson was beginning to replace the Ansons in Coastal Command with one squadron of Hudsons and one with both Ansons and Hudsons. Limited numbers of Ansons continued to serve in operational roles such as coastal patrols and air/sea rescue. Early in the war, an Anson scored a probable hit on a German U-boat. In June 1940, a flight of three Ansons was attacked by nine Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Bf 109s. Remarkably, before the dogfight ended, without losing any of their own, one of the Ansons destroyed two German aircraft and damaged a third. The aircraft's true role, however, was to train pilots for flying multi-engined bombers such as the Avro Lancaster. The Anson was also used to train the other members of a bomber's aircrew, such as navigators, wireless operators, bomb aimers and air gunners. Postwar, the Anson continued in the training and light transport roles. The last Ansons were withdrawn from RAF service with communications units on 28 June 1968. The Royal Australian Air Force operated 1,028 Ansons, mainly Mk Is, until 1955

Audax

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Manufacturer : Hawker Engineering Company
Production Began : 0
Retired : 0
Number Built : 625

Audax

Based largely on the Hawker Hart, which it resembled, the Hawker Audax was produced between 1931 and 1937. The aircraft was intended as a trainer / observation aircraft / light bomber. The Audax was the main army co-operation aircraft in RAF service from 1932 until its replacement by the Westland Lysander in 1937-8. The Audax was then used for second line duties, amongst them advanced training and communication duties in Britain. The number of aircraft produced meant that the Audax remained in use in India and the Middle East well into the Second World War. In Egypt a small number were used by Nos. 173 and 267 squadrons for local communication and transport duties, only being replaced in 1942. Further south No. 237 Squadron had used the Audax in operations on the Kenyan-Ethiopian border between the Italian declaration of war in June 1940 and September 1940 when the squadron concentrated on the Hawker Hardy. Finally in the Middle East, a number of Audaxes were allocated to No. 52 Squadron in Iraq between July 1941 and January 1942. However No. 52 Squadron had no aircrew, and so the aircraft were flown by pilots of No. 31 Squadron, providing local reconnaissance. The Audax saw most active service in India. The RAF in India had been stripped of many modern aircraft during the first two years of the war, leaving it very vulnerable after the Japanese entry into the war in December 1941. Two squadrons (Nos. 5 and 146) were even forced to use the Audax as single seat fighters, before receiving the Curtiss Mohawk in early 1942. No. 28 squadron retained a number of Audaxes during the Japanese advance through Burma. The final squadrons to use the Audax were Nos.1 and 3 of the Indian Air Force. No. 3 Squadron used the Audax to fly patrols over the North West Frontier between October 1941 and September 1943. Most remarkably, No. 1 Squadron used the Audax in its original role, as an army co-operation aircraft, for four months between September 1943 and January 1944.

BAC111

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BAC111

Full profile not yet available.

Hampden



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Manufacturer : Handley Page
Retired : 1942
Number Built : 1500

Hampden

The Handley Page HP.52 Hampden was a twin-engine medium bomber built for the Royal Air Force and was used by Bomber Command in the early years of world war two. Along with the other medium bombers the Whitley and Wellington, the Hampden bore the brunt of the early bombing war over Europe, taking part in the first night raid on Berlin and the first 1,000-plane raid on Cologne. The newest of the three medium bombers, the Hampden was known as the Flying Suitcase because of its cramped crew conditions. A total of 226 Hampdens were in service with eight Royal Air Force squadrons by the start of the Second World War. Despite its speed and agility, in operational use the Hampden was no match for the fighters of the Luftwaffe (ME109 and FW 190) and the Hampdens role as a day bomber was brief, but Hampdens continued to operate at night on bombing raids over Germany and in mine laying (code-named gardening) in the North Sea. Almost half of the Hampdens built 714, were lost on operations, witht he loss of 1,077 crew killed and another 739 missing. German flak accounted for 108; with one Hampden being lost due to German Barrage balloons; 263 Hampdens crashed due to a variety of causes, and 214 others were classed as missing. Luftwaffe pilots claimed 128 Hampdens, shooting down 92 at night. The Hampden soon became obsolete for its roll as a medium modern bomber, after operating mainly at night, it was retired from Bomber Command service in late 1942. but continued with Coastal Command throughout 1943 as a long-range Torpedo Bomber (the Hampden TB Mk I which carried the Mk XII torpedo in an open bomb-bay and a single 500lb (230kg) bomb under each wing) The Hampden was also used by the Royal Canadian Air Force and Royal New Zealand Air Force.

Hart



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Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1930
Number Built : 1042

Hart

During the mid 1920s The British Air Ministry recoignised the need for a light Bomber. The options were proposed the Avro Antelope, Fairey Fox and the Hawker Hart. Due to the low cost of maintenance for the hawker hart. It was chosen over the other two. The first prototype flew in June 1928 (J9052). Hawker Harts were first used in 1930 by No.33 Squadron at Eastchurch. Many of these aircraft were used overseas in India, the Middle East and South Africa, with some alterations being made to tropicalise the aircraft. With the Outcome being the Hart India. The Hawker Hart saw service during the Abyssinian Crisis in 1935/36 and served also in the North West Frontier of India. However, in Britain, most were being replaced by 1936, some still operating well into World War Two. Mainly in communication and Training roles until 1943 having been used by a total of 20 RAF and AAF Squadrons. A total of 1042 of this aircraft were built. The Hawker Hart saw service with many air forces. Including The Swedish Air Force who used it to great success as a dive bomber. (calling the Hart the B4), Egyptian Air Force, Royal Indian Air Force, Southern Rhodesian Air Force and Yugoslavian air force.

Hastings



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Hastings

Full profile not yet available.

Hind

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Manufacturer : Hawker
Production Began : 1935

Hind

The Hawker Hind entered service with the Royal Air Force in November1935 and eventually 20 RAF bomber squadrons equipped with Hawker Hinds. Many Hinds were also sold to foreign customers including Afghanistan, the Irish Free State, Latvia, Persia (Iran), Portugal, South Africa, Switzerland, and Yugoslavia. The Hawker Hind was gradually phased out of frontline service from 1936 onwards and replaced by the Fairey Battle and Bristol Blenheim. At the outbreak of world war two only 613 squadorn was still equipped with Hawker Hinds in the roll of Army co-operation before re-equipping the Hawker Hector in November 1939. The Hawker Hind became a training aircraft from 1938 being the next step up from basic training on Tiger Moths. In 1941, Hinds flew combat missions in their original role as light bombers. South African Hinds were employed against Italian forces in Kenya, Yugoslav Hinds were used against the Germans and Italians.

Lancaster



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Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1942
Retired : 1963
Number Built : 7377

Lancaster

The Avro Lancaster arose from the avro Manchester and the first prototype Lancaster was a converted Manchester with four engines. The Lancaster was first flown in January 1941, and started operations in March 1942. By March 1945 The Royal Air Force had 56 squadrons of Lancasters with the first squadron equipped being No.44 Squadron. During World War Two the Avro Lancaster flew 156,000 sorties and dropped 618,378 tonnes of bombs between 1942 and 1945. Lancaster Bomberss took part in the devastating round-the-clock raids on Hamburg during Air Marshall Harris' Operation Gomorrah in July 1943. Just 35 Lancasters completed more than 100 successful operations each, and 3,249 were lost in action. The most successful survivor completed 139 operations, and the Lancaster was scrapped after the war in 1947. A few Lancasters were converted into tankers and the two tanker aircraft were joined by another converted Lancaster and were used in the Berlin Airlift, achieving 757 tanker sorties. A famous Lancaster bombing raid was the 1943 mission, codenamed Operation Chastise, to destroy the dams of the Ruhr Valley. The operation was carried out by 617 Squadron in modified Mk IIIs carrying special drum shaped bouncing bombs designed by Barnes Wallis. Also famous was a series of Lancaster attacks using Tallboy bombs against the German battleship Tirpitz, which first disabled and later sank the ship. The Lancaster bomber was the basis of the new Avro Lincoln bomber, initially known as the Lancaster IV and Lancaster V. (Becoming Lincoln B1 and B2 respectively.) Their Lancastrian airliner was also based on the Lancaster but was not very successful. Other developments were the Avro York and the successful Shackleton which continued in airborne early warning service up to 1992.

Manchester

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Manufacturer : Avro

Manchester

Full profile not yet available.

Tigermoth



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Production Began : 1932
Retired : 1947
Number Built : 8800

Tigermoth

The Royal Air Force last bi-plane, which served as a trainer from 1932 to 1947. Its design remained nearly the same throughout its history, and was well constructed and able to do aerobatics. A total of 8800 Tiger Moths were built which included 420 Radio Controlled Pilotless Target aircraft. (The Queen Bee). For the Royal Air Force. It was also used for a short period during the first months of world war two for coastal reconnaissance. Maximum speed 109 mph, Ceiling 14,000 feet, and can remain airborne for three hours.

Victor



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Manufacturer : Handley Page

Victor

The Handley Page Victor was a British jet bomber aircraft produced by the Handley Page Aircraft Company. It was the third and final of the V bombers which provided Britain's nuclear deterrent. The other two V-bombers were the Avro Vulcan and the Vickers Valiant. The Victor was the last of the V-bombers to enter service and the last to retire, nine years after the last Vulcan (The Handley Page Victor saw service in the Falklands War and 1991 Gulf War as an in-flight refuelling tanker. The only Offensive mission that the Victors was during the Bornio Conflict in 1962 to 1966 where two B.1A Victors flew missions.

Wellington



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Manufacturer : Vickers
Production Began : 1938
Retired : 1953

Wellington

The Vickers Wellington was a Bomber aircraft and also used for maritime reconnaissance. and had a normal crew of six except in the MKV and VI where a crew of three was used. Maximum speed was 235 mph (MK1c) 255 mph (MK III, X) and 299 mph (MK IIII), normal operating range of 1805 miles (except MK III which was 1470miles) The Wellington or Wimpy as it was known, was the major bomber of the Royal Air Force between 1939 and 1943. The Royal Air Force received its first Wellingtons in October 1938 to 99 squadron. and by the outbreak of World war two there were 6 squadrons equipped with the Vickers Wellington. Due to heavy losses on daylight raids, the Wellington became a night bomber and from 1940 was also used as a long range bomber in North Africa. and in 1942 also became a long range bomber for the royal Air Force in India. It was well used by Coastal Command as a U-Boat Hunter. The Wellington remained in service with the Royal Air Force until 1953. Probably due to its versatile use, The aircraft was also used for experimental work including the fitting of a pressure cabin for High altitude tests. The Vickers Wellington could sustain major damage and still fly, probably due to its construction of its geodesic structure and practical application of geodesic lines. Designed by Sir Barnes Wallis

Aviation History Timeline : 14th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
14December1940 of No.112 Sqn RAF shot down a SM79
14December1940 of No.112 Sqn RAF shot down a SM79
14December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O K. J. Marston of 56 Squadron, was Killed.
14December1940Hauptmann Joachim Schlichting of Gruppenkommandeur of the III./Jagdgeschwader 27 was awarded the Knight's Cross
14December1940Hauptmann Waldemar Plewig of II./Sturzkampfgeschwader 77 was awarded the Knight's Cross
14December1940Oberleutnant Franz Baron von Werra of II./Jagdgeschwader 3 was awarded the Knight's Cross
14December1940Oberleutnant Karl Barth of 3./Kstenflieger-Gruppe 506 was awarded the Knight's Cross
14December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. T. L. French of 29 Squadron, was Killed.
14December1942Heinrich Krafft, a WW2 Ace with 78.00 victories, died on this day
14December1944Hans-Joachim Birkner, a WW2 Ace with 117.00 victories, died on this day
14December1944Knight's Cross recipient Hans-Joachim Birkner of 9./Jagdgeschwader 52 died on this day
14December2008Robert Abernathy, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day

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