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Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns

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Jaguar pilot, No.16 Sqn. Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns joined the Royal Air Force in 1988 and completed his Officer Training at the Royal Air Force College, Cranwell. Following flying training on the Jet Provost and the Hawk, he was posted to Lossiemouth in 1990 to 237(R) Squadron, the Buccaneer Operational Conversion Unit. After his conversion course, Paul was posted to 12(B) Squadron to fly the Buccaneer S2B in the maritime Strike/Attack Role. When 12(B) Squadron re-roled, Paul was posted 208 Squadron to continue flying the Buccaneer. With the demise of the Buccaneer in 1994, Paul was posted to 6 Squadron at Coltishall, flying the Jaguar GR1A. He has flown on exercises throughout Europe, North America and the Middle-East in addition to flying on peace-keeping operations over the former Yugoslavia. In 1998 Paul completed the Jaguar Qualified Weapons Instructor Course and was posted to the instructional staff of 16(R) Squadron, the Jaguar Operational Conversion Unit at Lossiemouth. When not displaying, his job on the Squadron is to teach pilots to fly and operate the Jaguar.

Items Signed by Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns

 Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns from 16 Squadron, RAF Coltishall launches the Jaguar into another breathtaking display sequence. ......
Enter the Saint by Robert Tomlin.
Price : £55.00
Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns from 16 Squadron, RAF Coltishall launches the Jaguar into another breathtaking display sequence. ......

Quantity:
 Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns from 16 Squadron, RAF Coltishall launches the Jaguar into another breathtaking display sequence. ......
Enter the Saint by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Price : £35.00
Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns from 16 Squadron, RAF Coltishall launches the Jaguar into another breathtaking display sequence. ......

Quantity:

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns

Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns

Squadrons for : Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.12 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 14th February 1915

Leads the field

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No.12 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.16 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 10th February 1915

Operta aperta - Hidden things are revealed

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.16 Sqn RAF

No.16 Sqn RAF

No. 16 Squadron was formed from elements of Nos. 2, 5 and 6 Squadrons at St Omer, France, on 10 February 1915. The unit flew more than its fair share of types including Voisins, BE2As, Bs, and Shorthorns, using them to pioneer the use of wireless to report enemy troop movements during the Battle of Abuers Ridge in May 1915. During 1916, the Squadron standardised on the BE2C. During the Battle of Vimy Ridge, the Squadron formed an association with the Canadian Corps that lasted until the Armistice. Along with so many other RAF Squadrons, No. 16 was disbanded in 1919. On 1 April 1924, No. 16 Squadron reformed at Old Sarum, spending the next ten years attached to the School of Army Co-operation flying Bristol Fighters, Atlas' and Audaxes. In May 1938, the Squadron became the first to receive Lysanders, taking them to France at the outbreak of World War II. After returning to the UK in May 1940, the Squadron was tasked with anti-invasion coastal patrols until Mustangs arrived in April 1942. These were used in 'Rhubarb' patrols over France and also intercepting enemy fighter-bombers mounting 'hit and run' raids along the South Coast. During the preparations for D-Day, reconnaissance Spitfires replaced the Mustangs, flying both high- and low-level reconnaissance sorties as 2TAF advanced towards Germany. In March 1946, after a period of confusion as to whether the Squadron had been disbanded or not, the Squadron inherited No. 56 Squadron's Tempests and moved to Gutersloh. No. 16 Squadron re-equipped with ground-attack Vampires in late 1948 and Venoms in 1954 before disbanding in June 1957. A year later, the Squadron was reformed at Laarbruch and began a 14-year association with Canberras before finally receiving Buccaneers in June 1972. The Buccaneers were replaced by Tornado GR1s in 1984, and, like its sister Squadron, No. XV, found itself disbanded in Germany in October 1991 under 'Options for Change' and its numberplate being assigned to an operational conversion unit, in this case No. 226 OCU at Lossiemouth. With the decision taken to run the Jaguar fleet down in ant

No.208 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st April 1918

Vigilant

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No.208 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.6 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 21st January 1914

Oculi exercitus - The eyes of the army

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.6 Sqn RAF

No.6 Sqn RAF

The squadron was formed on 31 January 1914, at Farnborough as No. 6 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. Its first squadron commander was Major John Becke. The Squadron finished the war flying RE8s, and shortly after the end of the War, it transferred to Iraq and re-equipped with Bristol Fighters. During the following years, it undertook operations against various uprisings before transferring to Egypt in 1929 and receiving Fairey Gordon bombers. Following increased tension between Arabs and Jews No 6 Sqn moved to Ramleh in Palestine during 1937 with Hawker Hardys. During the early part of WWII, the Squadron and its Lysanders remained in Palestine, but detached aircraft to the Western Desert until 1941 when Hurricanes were on strength. Further action in the Desert on anti-tank duties continued from 1942 until the end of the North African campaign. After converting to rocket-firing Hurricanes in 1944, the Squadron moved to Italy and flew the remainder of the War over the Balkans. A brief stint in Palestine after the War as followed by a move to Cyprus with Tempests.In July 1945, the squadron moved to Palestine. They cooperated with the police, patrolling the Kirkuk-to-Haifa oil pipeline to prevent terrorist attacks. The squadron remained in the Middle East until 1969. During this period, the squadron went from being equipped with Hurricanes (and for a brief period four Spitfires due to a lack of available Hurricanes) to Hawker Tempest Mk. VIs and subsequently De Havilland Vampire FB.5s. In January 1950 the squadron moved to RAF Habbaniya in Iraq with many moves back and forth between RAF Habbaniya and RAF Shaibah in Iraq, RAF Abu Sueir and RAF Deversoir in the Suez Canal Zone, RAF Nicosia in Cyprus, RAF Mafraq and RAF Amman in Jordan and detachments throughout the Middle East Throughout this period, it continued to operate Vampires and a twin-seat Gloster Meteor T.7 until re-equipped with De Haviland Venoms The Squadron finally left the Middle East in 1969 when it moved to Coningsby to become the first Phantom Squadron. During 1974, No 6 Sqn moved to RAF Coltishall and re-equipped with Jaguar fighter bombers. Operational deployments with the Jaguar have seen the squadron involved in Operation Granby (Gulf War 1), Warden (later Op Resinate North - Northern Iraq - until 2003) and Deny Flight (Balkans). In April 2006 No 6 Sqn moved to RAF Coningsby where it was the last RAF Sqn operating the Jaguar. On Monday 6 September 2010, No 6 Squadron, the first Typhoon fighter squadron in Scotland, officially stood up at Royal Air Force Leuchars.
Aircraft for : Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns
A list of all aircraft associated with Flight Lieutenant Paul Binns. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Buccaneer

Click the name above to see prints featuring Buccaneer aircraft.


Buccaneer

The Buccaneer. Designed for high-speed, deep penetration attacks at ultra low level, the Buccaneer has always been immensely popular with its aircrews. The design may be old, but the concept was brilliant, and the Buccaneer still retains a unique combination of range, war load and speed, unmatched by any other aircraft in RAF service. Pressed into service during the Gulf War, Buccaneers finally proved in the most spectacular manner what many had known for years - that the only suitable replacement aircraft for the Buccaneer is another Buccaneer.

Hawk



Click the name above to see prints featuring Hawk aircraft.

Manufacturer : BAE Systems.
Production Began : 1974
Retired : 0
Number Built : 1050

Hawk

The BAe Hawk News of the first flight of the Hawk on 21 August 1974 was greeted with derision by Hunter pilots at the RAF's tactical weapons training unit. For understandably selfish reasons they were sceptical about the ability of the Hawk to replace the rugged, versatile and much-loved Hunter. "Forget Hawk - Fly Hunter" was one typical bumper sticker of the time but now 25 years on, such scepticism seems barely credible. With the arrival of the first Hawk aircraft at RAF Valley in November 1976, a new era of flying training began, and the first of thousands of fast-jet pilots discovered the joys of flying this truly thoroughbred aircraft. Since then, the BAe Hawk has earned a reputation as the world's best advanced trainer and light strike aircraft. The basic design has been refined and improved in a series of variants ranging from multi-role light fighter to the US Navy's carrier trainer. But the one quality that sets the Hawk apart from other aircraft is handling characteristics. In the on pilots own words, - "I had flown the Gnat and Hunter and in 1979 had just finished flying Canberra PR9s before transferring to the Jaguar, when I was given the opportunity to get some flying on the Hawk. It was a revelation. Here was an aircraft that was pure joy to fly, at low level it settled comfortably at 450 knots at around 150 feet and it could be flown into valleys under the most frightening weather safe in the knowledge that it could be turned around without losing airspeed almost in its own length. And at medium level? 1v1 combat in this aircraft is something else, - compared with the Hawk, the Jaguar is like flying an anvil".

Jaguar



Click the name above to see prints featuring Jaguar aircraft.


Jaguar

Full profile not yet available.

Aviation History Timeline : 12th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O A. W. N. Britton of 263 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. H. Harrison of 145 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O W. H. DFM & Bar Franklin of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, S/L G. W. Montagu of 236 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. M. H. Hine of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. R. S. Hutton of 85 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. R. V. Hogg of 616 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. J. F. H. Bandinel of 3 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. K. Pollard of 232 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former Canadian Battle of Britain pilot, P/O A. L. Edy of 602 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former Polish Battle of Britain pilot, F/O B. Groszewski of 43 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O G. Ashfield of F.I.U., was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O G. A. Denby of 600 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. C. R. Hewlett of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former Canadian Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt E. G. Ford of 3 and 232 Squadrons, was Killed.
12December1944Alexander Preinfalk, a WW2 Ace with 76.00 victories, died on this day
12December1944Knight's Cross recipient Alexander Preinfalk of 5./Jagdgeschwader 77 died on this day
12December1945William Tipton, a WW1 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
12December2006Knight's Cross recipient Hans-Karl Stepp of 7./Sturzkampfgeschwader 2 died on this day
12December2006Oberstleutnant Hans-Karl Stepp, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
12December2006Wing Commander R C Dick Cresswell, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
12December2007Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O E. G. Barwell of 264 & 242 Squadrons, Passed away.
12December2007Joe Robbins, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
12December2007Wing Commander Eric Barwell, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day

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