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Squadron Leader Carl Spike Jepson

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Red Arrows Team Leader. Red I. Squadron Leader Carl Spike Jepson took command of the Red Arrows in November 2001. He joined the RAF in 1983 and his first front-line tour was on the Harrier GR3 with 1(F) Squadron, participating in exercises in Norway, Denmark and the USA. Sqn. Ldr. Jepson was selected for The Red Arrows in 1994. He was then posted to Dharan in Saudi Arabia where he trained the Royal Saudia Air Force Aerobatic Team from scratch. On his return to the UK, Sqn. Ldr. Jepson was once again posted to fly the Harrier and, amongst other things flew peacekeeping missions over the Balkans and operated from HMS Illustrious. He served as Flight Commander on 3(F) Squadron, RAF Cottesmore before taking command of the Red Arrows.

Items Signed by Squadron Leader Carl Spike Jepson

 Concorde and the Red Arrows minutes before the Queens Jubilee Fly past on 4th June 2003. ......The Jubilee Flight by Stephen Brown.
Price : £150.00
Concorde and the Red Arrows minutes before the Queens Jubilee Fly past on 4th June 2003. ......

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Concorde and the Red Arrows minutes before the Queens Jubilee Fly past on 4th June 2003. ......The Jubilee Flight by Stephen Brown (AP)
Price : £195.00
Concorde and the Red Arrows minutes before the Queens Jubilee Fly past on 4th June 2003. ......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Squadron Leader Carl Spike Jepson

Squadron Leader Carl Spike Jepson

Squadrons for : Squadron Leader Carl Spike Jepson
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Squadron Leader Carl Spike Jepson. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.1 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 13th May 1912

In Omnibus Princeps - First in all things

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.1 Sqn RAF

No.1 Sqn RAF

On 13 May 1912, with the establishment of the Royal Flying Corps, No. 1 Company of the Air Battalion was redesignated No. 1 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps. No. 1 Squadron was one of the original three Royal Flying Corps squadrons. Maitland continued as the new squadron's Officer Commanding and he was promoted to major several days after the establishment of the squadron. It retained the airships Beta and Gamma, adding Delta and Eta, as well as kites and a few spherical balloons. However, in October 1913 a sudden decision was made to transfer all the airships to the Naval Wing of the RFC (which became the Royal Naval Air Service by Admiralty dictat, not Cabinet decision, on 1 July 1914). While retaining kites 1 Squadron was reorganised as an 'aircraft park' for the British Expeditionary Force. On 1 May 1914, Major Charles Longcroft was appointed as the new squadron commander. Apart from a few weeks as a supernumerary in August and September 1914, Longcroft continued as the squadron commander until January 1915. The squadron returned to the UK from France in March 1919, being formally disbanded on 20 January 1920. On the next day it reformed at Risalpur in the North West Frontier of India (now part of Pakistan), flying the Sopwith Snipe. and from January 1920. It moved to Hinaidi near Baghdad in Iraq in May 1921, to carry out policing duties, retaining its Snipes, although it also received one Bristol Jupiter engined Nieuport Nighthawk for evaluation. It remained in Iraq, carrying out strafing and bombing against hostile tribal forces until November 1926 when it was disbanded. In early 1927 it was reformed at Tangmere, Sussex as a Home Defence Fighter Squadron, equipped with the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin. After receiving the Hawker Fury Mk.1 in February 1932, the squadron gained a reputation for aerobatics, giving displays throughout the United Kingdom and at the Zurich International Air Meeting in July 1937, where its display impressed but it was clear that it was outclassed by the German Messerschmitt Bf 109 and Dornier Do 17 also displayed at Zurich. The squadron re-equipped with the Hurricane Mk.I in October 1938 By the outbreak of the Second World War the Squadron had worked up sufficiently to deploy to France as part of 67 Wing of the Advanced Air Striking Force. In October it flew over enemy territory for the first time and on the 30th of that month claimed its first victory, a Dornier DO17. Further occasional combat took place and the successes mounted. However, the situation developed significantly in April 1940, and 10th May was the date on which No 1(Fighter) Squadron became fully operation in every sense of the word. Fighting was intense and a week later the Squadron was bombed out of its base at Berry-au-Bac; then began a series of retreats ending finally in a return to the UK. The Squadron was back at Tangmere by 23rd June and operational the following month. In August it marked its entry into the Battle of Britain by destroying 2 Messerschmitt BF110s; there was no let up in the fighting until 9th September when the Squadron moved North to Wittering for a rest. It returned South for the New Year when it engaged in fighter sweeps and carried out bomber escort duties. In February, it started Rhubarb and night flying; during the month the first of its Hurricane 11As arrived. This heralded a period of change for the Squadron whose strength now included both Czechs and Poles; the emphasis increasingly focused on night flying. In July the Squadron returned to Tangmere and, having achieved night operational status, this became its main task. The Squadron continued to conduct night intruder patrol until re-equipping with Hawker Typhoons in July 1942;it then moved North to Acklington where it reverted to daytime operations. The Unit exchanged its Typhoons for Spitfire X1s in April 1944 and with these continued its bombing raids. In June the Squadron began anti-V patrols (Divers) and this became its exclusive occupation, eventually tallying 39 hits. In the autumn it reverted to carrying out bomber escorts; to extend its range it sued the airfield at Haldegham on the Continent as an advanced landing ground. In May 1945 it converted to Spitfire F21s but these were only used operationally to cover the Channel Island landings. In 1946 the Squadron returned to Tangmere and took delivery of its first jet aircraft, Gloster Meteors. These aircraft were followed by Hawker Hunter F5s, which were flown from Cyprus during 1956 Suez crisis. In June 1958 No 1(Fighter) Squadron was disbanded but was reformed almost immediately on 1st July, to fly Hunter F6s from Stradishall, by renumbering No 2683 Squadron. It then moved to Waterbeach from where, flying Hunter FGA9s, it operated in the ground attack role as part of 38 Group. The Squadron continued in this role for the next 8 years, operating out of Waterbeach and then West Raynham. July 1969 heralded a move to Wittering to commence conversion to the Harrier and become the first operational squadron in the world to fly this unique vertical/short take off and landing aircraft. Since this time No 1(Fighter) Squadron has served in many parts of the globe, including Belize and most notably, the South Atlantic during the Falklands War in 1982, where it undertook the air defence role in Ascension Island before deploying for aircraft carrier based operations over the Falkland Islands equipped with Sidewinder air to air missile. Aircraft flew for 9 hours, direct to Ascension Island which set a new distance/duration record for the Harrier. Some aircraft then flew direct to the South Atlantic, where they operated from HMS HERMES. During this conflict, over 130 sorties were flown against heavily defended targets on the Islands; 3 aircraft were shot down by enemy fire. All 3 pilots ejected successfully, although one, who sustained shoulder injuries, was captured and became the only prisoner of war; he was later repatriated to the UK. The Squadron moved to RAF Stanley in the Falkland Islands at the end of hostilities and took on air defence duties until the latter part of the year when it returned to Wittering.

No.3 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 13th May 1912

Tertius primus erit - The Third shall be first

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No.3 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

Red Arrows

Country : UK

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of Red Arrows
Red Arrows

Full profile not yet available.

Aviation History Timeline : 13th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
13December1918Julius Fichter, a WW1 Ace with 6.00 victories, died on this day
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, (F.A.A.) Lt. G. F. Russell of 804 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O A. H. Pettet of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. D. Dodd of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. H. W. Walmsly of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. S. Hamilton of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O H. J. Jeffcoat of 236 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. P. A. Dale of 141 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. B. J. E. DFC Lane of 19 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1969Viktor Bauer, a WW2 Ace with 106.00 victories, died on this day
13December2000Air Vice Marshal Sandy Johnstone CB DFC AE DL, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
13December2000Former British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. A. V. R. Johnstone DFC of 602 Squadron, Passed away.
13December2004Franz-Josef Beerenbrock, a WW2 Ace with 117.00 victories, died on this day
13December2004Franz-Josef Beerenbrock, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
13December2004Knight's Cross recipient Franz-Josef Beerenbrock of 10./Jagdgeschwader 51 died on this day

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