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Flt/Lt P G Taylor

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Joined the RAF as an Aircraft Apprentice at Halton in 1938, aged 16. In 1940 he became airframe fitter on the Maintenance Unit and volunteered for aircrew in 1941. He was recommended for training as a Navigator, completed his ground training in the UK and his flying training in Port Albert, Canada. On completion, he was Commissioned and returned to the UK in January 1943, where he commenced familiarisation training in Tiger Moths (15 EFTS) and Ansons. In August 1943, along with a pilot, wireless operator and bomb aimer, he commenced training on Whitleys. From December 1943 to January 1944, he underwent training for conversion to Halifaxes and was posted to 10 Sqdn. After one operation he was transferred to 158 Sqdn (Lissett). On his tenth op. (18th April 1944) his aircraft was returning from a bombing raid on the marshalling yards at Tergunier (northern France) when they were attacked by a German night-fighter. The port wing of the aircraft was on fire, they went into a steep dive and the pilot shouted Bale Out. Fortunately for him, the navigator position in the Halifax was next to the forward escape hatch and both he and the Flight Engineer were the only ones able to bale out, the other five crew members were all killed on impact. The Flight Engineer was captured the next day but Flt/Lt Taylor avoided capture and was sheltered by the Resistance in various safe houses until 28th July. By this time in the war French collaborators had infiltrated the Resistance Movement and were turning evading Allied airmen over to the Germans. Flt/Lt Taylor was betrayed and turned over to the Germans on 28th July. He was imprisoned in Paris with approximately 140 other Allied airmen captured in similar circumstances. When Allied forces closed in on Paris, all prisoners mainly French civilians were packed into cattle trucks and evacuated to Germany, destination unknown, which turned out to be Buchenwald concentration camp. Along with other airmen, he was subsequently transferred to Stalag Luft 3 on 21st October where he remained as POW until the Russian advanced forced evacuation of all POWs and a long trek, finishing near Hamburg just as Germany surrendered.

Items Signed by Flt/Lt P G Taylor

In the depths of winter, Halifax aircraft of 158 Squadron based at RAF Lissett, Yorkshire, make their final preparations before take off. A remarkable aircraft much loved by its crews.......
Mutual Support by Philip West.
Price : £125.00
In the depths of winter, Halifax aircraft of 158 Squadron based at RAF Lissett, Yorkshire, make their final preparations before take off. A remarkable aircraft much loved by its crews.......

Quantity:
 In the depths of winter, Halifax aircraft of 158 Squadron based at RAF Lissett, Yorkshire, make their final preparations before take off. A remarkable aircraft much loved by its crews. ......
Mutual Support by Philip West. (AP)
Price : £150.00
In the depths of winter, Halifax aircraft of 158 Squadron based at RAF Lissett, Yorkshire, make their final preparations before take off. A remarkable aircraft much loved by its crews. ......

Quantity:
 In the depths of winter, Halifax aircraft of 158 Squadron based at RAF Lissett, Yorkshire, make their final preparations before take off. A remarkable aircraft much loved by its crews. ......
Mutual Support by Philip West. (Y)
Price : £95.00
In the depths of winter, Halifax aircraft of 158 Squadron based at RAF Lissett, Yorkshire, make their final preparations before take off. A remarkable aircraft much loved by its crews. ......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flt/Lt P G Taylor

WW2 Halifax Bomber Prints by Philip West and Gerald Coulson.
Pack Price : £220.00
Saving : £215
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Leading the Way by Gerald Coulson.
Mutual Support by Philip West.

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WW2 Halifax Prints by Philip West and Robert Taylor.
Pack Price : £180.00
Saving : £185
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Mutual Support by Philip West.
Halifax Legend by Robert Taylor

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Handley Page Halifax Aircraft Prints by Ivan Berryman and Philip West.
Pack Price : £180.00
Saving : £140
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Mutual Support by Philip West.
Friday the 13th by Ivan Berryman. (B)

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WW2 Bomber Command Halifax Prints by Philip West and Ivan Berryman.
Pack Price : £165.00
Saving : £165
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Mutual Support by Philip West.
Halifax Tugs Towing Hamilcar Gliders by Ivan Berryman. (D)

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Halifax Aircraft Aviation Print Pack by Ivan Berryman and Philip West.
Pack Price : £160.00
Saving : £235
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Mutual Support by Philip West.
Halifax Mk.III NA337 by Ivan Berryman. (D)

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Flt/Lt P G Taylor

Squadrons for : Flt/Lt P G Taylor
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flt/Lt P G Taylor. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.10 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st January 1915

Rem acu tangere - To hit the mark

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.10 Sqn RAF

No.10 Sqn RAF

No.10 Sqn was formed on 1st January 1915 (from elements of No. 1 Reserve Squadron) moving to to St Omer, France in July 1915. The squadron flew BE2C's in August 1915 in the role of spotters for the Indian Corps during the Battle of Loos. During the Battle of Arras in April 1917 the squadron carried out some bombing sorties. After the First World war had ended No.10 squadron served in Germany before returning back the the UK and was disbanded in the winter of 1919. No.10 squadron was reformed in January 1928 as a heavy bomber squadron nad based at Upper Heyford. The squadron was equipped with Hyderabads, and over the following 10 eyars the squadron flew an assortment of bombers, including Hinaidis, Virginias and Heyfords. In January 1937, the Squadron was re equipped with Whitley bombers and moved to Dishforth. For the first few months of the Second World War, No. 10 Squadron carried out leaflet-dropping missions over Germany and in late 1941 was re equipped with the Halifax bomber. In May 1945, the squadron moved form Bomber Command to Transport Command and was re equipped with Dakotas. After the war the squadron was disbanded in 1947 only to be bought back into service for the Belrin Airlift in 1948 again flying the Dakota. Once the emergency was over the squadron again was disbanded. The squadron was again reformed during the 1950's and equipped with Canberras and was involved in operation during the Suez Crisis and during 1958 to 1964 the squadron was again re equipped with Victors based at Cottesmore. In July 1966 No.10 squadron were to be come the first squadron to be equipped with VC10s and since then were involved in air to air refuelling and tanker transport. The squadron was disbanded in October 2005 at Brize Norton, but reformed once again on 1st July 2011 flying Airbus Voyager aircraft.


Battle Honours of No 10 Squadron

Western Front 1915-1918
Loos, Somme 1916
Arras, Somme 1918
Channel and North Sea 1940-1945
Norway 1940
Ruhr 1940-1945
Fortress Europe 1940-1944
German Ports 1940-1945
Biscay Ports 1940-1945
Berlin 1940-1945
Invasion Ports 1940
France and Germany 1944-1945
Norway 1944
Rhine
Gulf 1991
Iraq 2003.


No.158 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 4th September 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st December 1945

Strength in unity

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.158 Sqn RAF

No.158 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Flt/Lt P G Taylor
A list of all aircraft associated with Flt/Lt P G Taylor. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Anson

Click the name above to see prints featuring Anson aircraft.

Manufacturer : Avro
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1968
Number Built : 11020

Anson

he Avro Anson originated from the Avro 652 commercial aircraft which first flew on 7th January 1935. It was a twin-engine British-built multi-role aircraft which saw distinctive service with both the Royal Air Force and The Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm as well as The Royal Canadian Air Force during and after the Second World War. The prototype 652A first flew at Woodford on 7th January 1935 and was developed from an initial airliner design and named after Admiral George Anson. The adaptation for a coastal reconnaissance role resulted in the production variant, the Avro 652a, which flew at Woodford on New Years Eve 1935 with the type entering service in March 1936 as the Anson Mk1. Initially it was flown with a 3-man crew but later developments in its reconnaissance role required a 4th crew member. The Anson entered service on 6 March 1936 with 48 Squadron equipped with the Anson. At the start of the Second World War, the RAF had received 824 Ansons and there were 26 RAF squadrons operating the Anson I: 10 with Coastal Command and 16 with Bomber Command. All of the squadrons in Bomber Command in 1939 with Anson Is were operational training squadrons that prepared crews for frontline service. 12 of the squadrons were in No. 6 (Operational Training) Group. Newly formed crews having completed individual flying and technical training were first trained as bomber crews in Ansons and then advanced to the various frontline aircraft types, which were also in the same squadrons with the Ansons. After training in the frontline aircraft type, crews would advance to the frontline bomber squadrons with those aircraft types (Fairey Battle, Bristol Blenheim, Vickers Wellington, Armstrong Whitworth Whitley, and Handley-Page Hampden). At the start of the war, the Lockheed Hudson was beginning to replace the Ansons in Coastal Command with one squadron of Hudsons and one with both Ansons and Hudsons. Limited numbers of Ansons continued to serve in operational roles such as coastal patrols and air/sea rescue. Early in the war, an Anson scored a probable hit on a German U-boat. In June 1940, a flight of three Ansons was attacked by nine Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Bf 109s. Remarkably, before the dogfight ended, without losing any of their own, one of the Ansons destroyed two German aircraft and damaged a third. The aircraft's true role, however, was to train pilots for flying multi-engined bombers such as the Avro Lancaster. The Anson was also used to train the other members of a bomber's aircrew, such as navigators, wireless operators, bomb aimers and air gunners. Postwar, the Anson continued in the training and light transport roles. The last Ansons were withdrawn from RAF service with communications units on 28 June 1968. The Royal Australian Air Force operated 1,028 Ansons, mainly Mk Is, until 1955

Halifax



Click the name above to see prints featuring Halifax aircraft.

Manufacturer : Handley Page
Production Began : 1941
Retired : 1952
Number Built : 6177

Halifax

Royal Air Force heavy Bomber with a crew of six to eight. Maximum speed of 280mph (with MK.VI top speed of 312mph) service ceiling of 22,800feet maximum range of 3,000 miles. The Halifax carried four .303 browning machine guns in the tail turret, two .303 browning machines in the nose turret in the MK III there were four .303 brownings in the dorsal turret. The Handley Page Halifax, first joined the Royal Air Force in March 1941 with 35 squadron. The Halifax saw service in Europe and the Middle east with a variety of variants for use with Coastal Command, in anti Submarine warfare, special duties, glider-tugs, and troop transportation roles. A total of 6177 Halifax's were built and stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1952

Tigermoth



Click the name above to see prints featuring Tigermoth aircraft.

Production Began : 1932
Retired : 1947
Number Built : 8800

Tigermoth

The Royal Air Force last bi-plane, which served as a trainer from 1932 to 1947. Its design remained nearly the same throughout its history, and was well constructed and able to do aerobatics. A total of 8800 Tiger Moths were built which included 420 Radio Controlled Pilotless Target aircraft. (The Queen Bee). For the Royal Air Force. It was also used for a short period during the first months of world war two for coastal reconnaissance. Maximum speed 109 mph, Ceiling 14,000 feet, and can remain airborne for three hours.

Whitley

Click the name above to see prints featuring Whitley aircraft.

Manufacturer : Armstrong Whitworth
Production Began : 1937
Retired : 1942
Number Built : 1814

Whitley

The Whitley first entered service with No. 10 Squadron in March 1937, replacing Handley Page Heyford biplanes. By the outbreak of the Second World War, seven squadrons were operational, the majority flying Whitley IIIs or IVs, as the Whitley V had only just been introduced. ] With the Handley Page Hampden and the Vickers Wellington, Whitleys bore the brunt of the early fighting and saw action on the first night of the war, when they dropped propaganda leaflets over Germany.[8] Among the many aircrew who flew the Whitley in operations over Germany, was Leonard Cheshire who spent most of his first three years at war flying them. Unlike the Hampden and Wellingtonwhich met specification B.9/32 for a day bomberthe Whitley was always intended for night operations and escaped the early heavy losses received in daylight raids on German shipping, early in the war. With Hampdens, the Whitley made the first bombing raid on German soil on the night of 19/20 March 1940, attacking the Hornum seaplane base on the Island of Sylt. Whitleys also carried out Operation Haddock the first RAF raid on Italy, on the night of 11/12 June 1940. As the oldest of the three bombers, the Whitley was obsolete by the start of the war, yet over 1,000 more were produced before a suitable replacement was found. A particular problem with the twin-engine aircraft, was that it could not maintain altitude on one engine. Whitleys flew 8,996 operations with RAF Bomber Command, dropped 9,845 tons (8,931 tonnes) of bombs and 269 aircraft were lost in action. From April 1942, the Whitley was retired as first-line bomber. It continued to serve as glider tug, paratroop trainer, transport, or radio countermeasures aircraft. It also played an important role in Coastal Command . No. 100 Group RAF used Whitleys to carry airborne radar and electronic counter-measures. In February 1942, Whitleys carried the paratroops who participated in the Bruneval raid (Operation Biting) in which German radar technology was captured from a German base on the coast of France. The British Overseas Airways Corporation operated 15 Whitley Mk Vs converted into freighters in 1942. Running night supply flights from Gibraltar to Malta, they took seven hours to reach the island, often landing during air attacks. They used large quantities of fuel for a small payload and were replaced in August 1942 by the Lockheed Hudson, with the 14 survivors being returned to the Royal Air Force. Long-range Coastal Command Mk VII variants, were among the last in front-line service, with the first kill attributed to them being the sinking of the German submarine U-751, on 17 July 1942, in combination with a Lancaster heavy bomber.

Aviation History Timeline : 18th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
18December1941Feldwebel Gerhard Kppen of 7./Jagdgeschwader 52 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1941Hauptmann Theodor Triebe of 1./Flak-Regiment 7 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1941Oberleutnant Matthias Schwegler of I./Kampfgeschwader 51 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1944Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O D. M. Crook of 609 Squadron, was Killed.
18December1959Gerald Maxwell, a WW1 Ace with 21.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Hans Hahn, a WW2 Ace with 108.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Hans Rudel, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
18December1982Hans-Ulrich Rudel, a WW2 Ace with 11.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Knight's Cross recipient Hans-Ulrich Rudel of 9./Sturzkampfgeschwader 2 died on this day
18December2007Lawrence ONeill, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
18December2008Air Commodore Peter Brothers CBE, DSO, DFC*, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
18December2008Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/Lt. P. M. Brothers of 32 & 257 Squadrons, Passed away.
18December2008Peter Brothers, a WW2 Ace with 15.00 victories, died on this day

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