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Air Commodore Bob Lightfoot AFC

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No.74 Squadron, 226 OCU, No.29 Squadron, Officer Commanding No.5 Squadron.



Items Signed by Air Commodore Bob Lightfoot AFC

 No.5 Sqn and No.11 Sqn Lightnings intercept a Tu-95 Bear, supported by an essential Victor tanker.  QRA, day and night, 24hrs a day, 7 days a week 52 weeks a year, 365 days a year - never a day off, always ready!  Over and over again for so many yea......
Lightning QRA Intercept by Michael Rondot. (AP)
Price : £150.00
No.5 Sqn and No.11 Sqn Lightnings intercept a Tu-95 Bear, supported by an essential Victor tanker. QRA, day and night, 24hrs a day, 7 days a week 52 weeks a year, 365 days a year - never a day off, always ready! Over and over again for so many yea......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Air Commodore Bob Lightfoot AFC

Air Commodore Bob Lightfoot AFC

Squadrons for : Air Commodore Bob Lightfoot AFC
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Air Commodore Bob Lightfoot AFC. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.29 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th November 1915

Impiger et acer - Energetic and keen

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.29 Sqn RAF

No.29 Sqn RAF

No 29 Squadron was formed at Gosport on 7 November 1915 from a nucleus supplied by No 23 Squadron, and after training moved to France in March 1916 as the third squadron to be fully equipped with fighters. Its DH2s were engaged in escort duties to protect the slow and vulnerable reconnaissance aircraft over the Western Front ,By late 1916 the DH.2 was outclassed by new German fighters, but No. 29 kept its pushers until March 1917, when it was re-equipped with Nieuport 17s. These were replaced with later Nieuport types, such as the Nieuport 24bis, as these became available. Due to a shortage of the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a the squadron retained its Nieuports until April 1918, being replaced by SE5As, which were used for the rest of the war on fighter and ground -attack missions. After a short period in Germany, the squadron Squadron was reduced to a cadre and in August 1919 returned to Spittlegate in the UK, in August 1919 where it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. The squadron was reformed on 1 April 1923, initially equipped with Sopwith Snipes. These were replaced by Gloster Grebes in January 1925, In turn, these were replaced by the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin IIIA in March 1928 and Bristol Bulldogs in June 1932. In March 1935, the squadron received two-seater Hawker Demons, which it operated until 1938. This included service in Egypt from October 1935 to 1936, during the Abyssinian crisis. The squadron also operated a few old Fairey Gordons for night patrols in Egypt. No 29 began the Second World War with its Blenheims, which at the period operated as day fighters especially on convoy protection patrols. From June 1940 it became a night fighter squadron, receiving some of the first Beaufighters in November, though it was February 1941 before the squadron was fully equipped with the new fighter. Various marks of the de Havilland Mosquito were flown by the squadron from May 1943 culminating in the Mosquito NF30. From the middle of 1944 most of the squadrons missions took it over the continent. The Mosquitoes continued to serve until replaced by Meteors in August 1951 at Tangmere. In January 1957 the squadron Squadron moved north, first to Northumberland and then in July 1958 to Scotland, conversion to Javelins taking having taken place in November 1957. In February 1963, No 29 was moved to Cyprus and in December 1965 went detached to Zambia for nine months on detachmentduring the Rhodesian crisis. In May 1967 the squadron Squadron returned to the UK to become are-equip with Lightnings squadron, disbanding on 31 December 1974. No 29 reformed at Coningsby as a Phantom squadron on 1 January 1975. A detachment was provided for the defence of the Falklands as soon as the airfield at Stanley was capable of operating Phantoms at the endin August of 1982. This became No 23 Squadron in March 1983 The Squadron swapped its Phantoms for Tornado F3 fighters in 1987 remaining at Coningsby until disbanded in October 1998. Five years later, the squadron was reformed, this time as the Typhoon operational conversion unit (OCU) based at BAE Systems' Warton airfield. In April 1987, No 29 Squadron became the first operational squadron to be equipped with the Tornado F3, deploying to Saudi Arabia after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990 and flying throughout Operation DESERT STORM in the air-defence role. The Squadron was again disbanded in October 1998.

No.74 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st July 1917
Trinidad

I fear no man

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.74 Sqn RAF

No.74 Sqn RAF

Hurricane of 56 Squadron was shot down by mistake by No. 74 Squadron and Pilot Officer M L Halton-Harrop of 56 sqd was killed on the 6th September 1939

Aviation History Timeline : 11th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
11December1928Gustav Dorr, a WW1 Ace with 35.00 victories, died on this day
11December1943Johannes Bunzek, a WW2 Ace with 75.00 victories, died on this day
11December1943Knight's Cross recipient Johannes Bunzek of 7./Jagdgeschwader 52 died on this day
11December1943Rudolf Wagner, a WW2 Ace with 81.00 victories, died on this day
11December1974E Lussier, a WW1 Ace with 9.00 victories, died on this day
11December1986Air Chief Marshal Sir Augustus Walker GCB CBE DSO DFC AFC, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
11December2006Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. R. Toombs of 236 Squadron, Passed away.
11December2006J R Toombs, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day

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