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Squadron Leader Grant T Taylor

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Joined the Air Force in 1960 as an Apprentice at RAF Locking and then as a Cadet at RAF College Cranwell. Initially served as a QFI at RAF Syerston before converting to Hunters as a Fighter Reconnaissance pilot on 8 Sqn in Bahrain. In 1971 he converted to Lightnings serving as a QFI/IRE on 23 Sqn at RAF Leuchars. In 1975 he converted to the Phantom and served a tour on 29 Sqn RAF Coningsby as QFI/IRE before taking up post on the Phantom OCU until 1986. During this period he also flew the Spitfire and Hurricane aircraft of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight for four years. In 1986 he flew BAC 167 aircraft at the King Feisal Air Academy in Saudi Arabia returning to UK in 1988 to train flying instructors on Jet Provost and Tucano aircraft at the Central Flying School at RAF Scampton. In 1990 he was posted to the Central Flying School Exam Wing as a Basic and Advanced Command Examiner and Command IRE on Hawks, Jet Provost and Tucano aircraft. He served his last tour on 55 Sqn at RAF Cranwell flying the Dominie (HS125). In 1997 he retired from the RAF to become an Aviation Officer and continued to fly the Dominie until 2003. He then joined the instructional staff at the Hawk Synthetic Training Facility at RAF Valley. He has a total of 9500 hours.

Items Signed by Squadron Leader Grant T Taylor

 A pair of 29 Squadron Lightning F.Mk3s tuck their gear up and head skyward from the Wattisham tarmac in the summer of 1972. ......
QRA Scramble by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Price : £240.00
A pair of 29 Squadron Lightning F.Mk3s tuck their gear up and head skyward from the Wattisham tarmac in the summer of 1972. ......

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  High in its element, a lone BAE Lightning F.6 glints in the evening sunshine as it returns from a sortie over the North Sea in the late 1970s. ......
The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Price : £230.00
High in its element, a lone BAE Lightning F.6 glints in the evening sunshine as it returns from a sortie over the North Sea in the late 1970s. ......

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Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as th......Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown.
Price : £115.00
Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as th......

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 Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as t......Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown (AP)
Price : £145.00
Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as t......

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 Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as t......Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown. (W)
Price : £55.00
Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as t......

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  10th May 1988 - the retirement of the English Electric Lightning. ......
Binbrook Finale by D Mahoney. (B)
Price : £140.00
10th May 1988 - the retirement of the English Electric Lightning. ......

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Lightning Strike by Keith Aspinall. (B)
Price : £180.00
......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Squadron Leader Grant T Taylor


Lightning Aviation Art Print Pack.
Pack Price : £280.00
Saving : £305
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown.
Thunder & Lightnings by Gerald Coulson.
The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman.
Portrait of Power by Keith Woodcock.

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Two Lightning Aircraft Prints by Ivan Berryman and Stephen Brown.
Pack Price : £130.00
Saving : £195
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman.
Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown.
QRA Scramble by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:
English Electric Lightning Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Pack Price : £260.00
Saving : £155
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown.
Thunder & Lightnings by Gerald Coulson.

Quantity:
Squadron Leader Grant T Taylor

Squadrons for : Squadron Leader Grant T Taylor
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Squadron Leader Grant T Taylor. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.23 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915
Fate : The squadron disbanded on 2 October 2009, when it amalgamated with No 8 Squadron.

Semper aggessus - Always having attacked

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.23 Sqn RAF

No.23 Sqn RAF

o. 23 Squadron formed at Fort Grange, Gosport on 1 Sep 1915 under the command of one of the RAF's most experienced operational pilots - Captain Louis Strange. After a brief period attempting to counter German airship flights over London, the Squadron moved to France with its FE2Bs initially employed on escort duties. By early 1917, Spad single-seaters had arrived, and were being used on offensive patrols over the front and low-level strafing attacks against German troops By the end of the War, the Squadron had converted to Dolphins, and flew these until disbanded at the end of 1919. On 1 July 1925, No. 23 Squadron reformed at Henlow with Snipes, but these were replaced shortly after with Gloster Gamecocks. In 1931, the Squadron was tasked with carrying out trials on the new Hawker Hart two-seaters, taking the production version, known as Demons, on strength in 1933 n 1938 it became a night-fighter squadron using the Bristol Blenheim. Following the outbreak of the Second World War, these were replaced by the Douglas Havoc and later the de Havilland Mosquito. Between 1942 and 1944 the squadron was based on Malta. It then returned to England and served as an intruder squadron, targeting German night fighters, over western Europe. 23 Sqn was disbanded, following the war's end, in September 1945 The squadron was reformed on 1 September 1946 as a night fighter squadron operating the de Havilland Mosquito.[8] It received jet aircraft in the form of de Havilland Vampire NF.10s in 1953, replacing them with de Havilland Venom NF.2s in June 1954. The squadron acquired Venom NF.3 in 1957.but was soon replaced with Gloster Javelin all-weather fighter, beginning a long period operating in the air defence role. The squadron has a strong heritage in the air defence role, operating Gloster Javelins, Lightnings, Phantoms and Tornado F3s. The squadron first acquired Phantoms on 1 November 1975 at RAF Coningsby before moving to RAF Wattisham for just under 10 years. Then in October 1983 the squadron deployed to Stanley airfield, Falkland Islands after their recapture from Argentina, arriving there on 1 November. They remained here until 31 October 1988 when its duty was assumed by 1435 Flight. The squadron then reformed on 1 November 1988 at RAF Leeming with the Panavia Tornado which it operated until 26 February 1994, when the unit was disbanded. The squadron assumed the Airborne Early Warning role upon reformation in April 1996, sharing the RAF's Sentry AEW1 fleet with No. 8 Squadron. The squadron disbanded on 2 October 2009, when it amalgamated with No 8 Squadron.

No.29 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th November 1915

Impiger et acer - Energetic and keen

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.29 Sqn RAF

No.29 Sqn RAF

No 29 Squadron was formed at Gosport on 7 November 1915 from a nucleus supplied by No 23 Squadron, and after training moved to France in March 1916 as the third squadron to be fully equipped with fighters. Its DH2s were engaged in escort duties to protect the slow and vulnerable reconnaissance aircraft over the Western Front ,By late 1916 the DH.2 was outclassed by new German fighters, but No. 29 kept its pushers until March 1917, when it was re-equipped with Nieuport 17s. These were replaced with later Nieuport types, such as the Nieuport 24bis, as these became available. Due to a shortage of the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a the squadron retained its Nieuports until April 1918, being replaced by SE5As, which were used for the rest of the war on fighter and ground -attack missions. After a short period in Germany, the squadron Squadron was reduced to a cadre and in August 1919 returned to Spittlegate in the UK, in August 1919 where it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. The squadron was reformed on 1 April 1923, initially equipped with Sopwith Snipes. These were replaced by Gloster Grebes in January 1925, In turn, these were replaced by the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin IIIA in March 1928 and Bristol Bulldogs in June 1932. In March 1935, the squadron received two-seater Hawker Demons, which it operated until 1938. This included service in Egypt from October 1935 to 1936, during the Abyssinian crisis. The squadron also operated a few old Fairey Gordons for night patrols in Egypt. No 29 began the Second World War with its Blenheims, which at the period operated as day fighters especially on convoy protection patrols. From June 1940 it became a night fighter squadron, receiving some of the first Beaufighters in November, though it was February 1941 before the squadron was fully equipped with the new fighter. Various marks of the de Havilland Mosquito were flown by the squadron from May 1943 culminating in the Mosquito NF30. From the middle of 1944 most of the squadrons missions took it over the continent. The Mosquitoes continued to serve until replaced by Meteors in August 1951 at Tangmere. In January 1957 the squadron Squadron moved north, first to Northumberland and then in July 1958 to Scotland, conversion to Javelins taking having taken place in November 1957. In February 1963, No 29 was moved to Cyprus and in December 1965 went detached to Zambia for nine months on detachmentduring the Rhodesian crisis. In May 1967 the squadron Squadron returned to the UK to become are-equip with Lightnings squadron, disbanding on 31 December 1974. No 29 reformed at Coningsby as a Phantom squadron on 1 January 1975. A detachment was provided for the defence of the Falklands as soon as the airfield at Stanley was capable of operating Phantoms at the endin August of 1982. This became No 23 Squadron in March 1983 The Squadron swapped its Phantoms for Tornado F3 fighters in 1987 remaining at Coningsby until disbanded in October 1998. Five years later, the squadron was reformed, this time as the Typhoon operational conversion unit (OCU) based at BAE Systems' Warton airfield. In April 1987, No 29 Squadron became the first operational squadron to be equipped with the Tornado F3, deploying to Saudi Arabia after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990 and flying throughout Operation DESERT STORM in the air-defence role. The Squadron was again disbanded in October 1998.

No.55 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 8th June 1916
Fate : With the end of the Victors, No 55 was disbanded,

Nil nos tremefacit - Nothing shakes us

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.55 Sqn RAF

No.55 Sqn RAF

No. 55 Squadron was formed at Castle Bromwich on 27 April 1916. It initially operated as a training unit, flying a mixture of types, including the Avro 504, Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2 and the Armstrong Whitworth F.K.8, but in January 1917 it changed its role to a day-bomber squadron and re-equipped with the Airco DH.4, being the first squadron to receive the new light bomber. It took these to France on 6 March that year as part of 9th Wing, flying its first bombing mission against Valenciennes railway station on 23 April 1917 in support of the Battle of Arras. It became part of the Independent Air Force as part of No 41 Wing based at Azelot, carrying out daylight strategic bombing missions against targets in Germany. 55 Squadron developed tactics of flying in wedge formations, bombing on the leader's command and with the massed defensive fire of the formation deterring attacks by enemy fighters. Despite heavy losses, 55 Squadron continued in operation, the only one of the day bombing squadrons in the Independent Force which did not have to temporarily stand down owing to aircrew losses. The squadron flew 221 bombing missions during the war, dropping approximately 141 long tons (143,000 kg) of bombs during the war. Following the Armistice on 11 November 1918, 55 Squadron was briefly used to run airmail services to British forces, before returning to the United Kingdom and losing its aircraft in January 1919, formally disbanding on 22 January 1920 On 1 February 1920, the unit was reformed at Suez with the renumbering of No 142 Squadron, and the unit embarked its DH9s on board HMS Ark Royal for transport to Turkey as part of 'Q' Force, assisting the Army in the defence of Constantinople and the Dardenelles. Two months later in August, the Squadron took up 'air policing' duties in Iraq, a task that was to last for the next 19 years. Wapitis (1930) and Vincents (1937) subsequently replaced the DH9s and the Squadron's first monoplane, the Blenheim, arrived in March 1939. Between September 1939 and June 1940, the Squadron patrolled the Suez region until Italy joined the War and bombing raids over Libya began. In March 1942, Baltimores replaced the Blenheims, and the unit supported the Eighth Army as it advanced through the Eastern Desert and into Italy. After re-equipping with Bostons in October 1944, No 55 remained in Italy, transferring to Hassani, Greece in September 1945 and receiving Mosquitos. The Squadron was disbanded in November 1946 and remained absent from the RAF's Order of Battle until 1 September 1960, when it reformed at Honington with Victors as part of Bomber Command's famous 'V' Force. May 1965 saw No 55 begin air-to-air refuelling duties, a role it continued until the retirement of the very last Victors in 1993. During this time, the Squadron took part in Operation Corporate, alongside its fellow Victor squadron, No 57, 55 Squadron provided tanker support during the Falklands War in 1982, including for the Operation Black Buck raids, where they refuelled Avro Vulcan bombers to allow them to reach the Falklands from Ascension Island. 55 Squadron's Victors went to war again in 1991, when it was deployed to the Gulf as part of Operation Granby, Britain's response to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, refuelling coalition aircraft during Operation Desert Storm. It disbanded on 15 October 1993, the last Squadron to operate the Victor. With the end of the Victors, No 55 was disbanded,

No.8 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st January 1915

Uspiam et passim - Everywhere unbounded

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.8 Sqn RAF

No.8 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Squadron Leader Grant T Taylor
A list of all aircraft associated with Squadron Leader Grant T Taylor. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Hunter

Click the name above to see prints featuring Hunter aircraft.

Manufacturer : Hawker
Retired : 1971
Number Built : 1972

Hunter

Hawker Hunter F-1 to Fr-10 jet fighter and fighter reconnaissance aircraft first flew with No43 squadron Royal Air Force in July 1954. The Hawker Hunter continued service until 1971. The Hunters were used by two RAF display units, the Black Arrows of No. 111 Squadron who set a record by looping and barrel rolling in formation 22 Hunters, and later the Blue Diamonds of 92 Squadron that used 16 Hunters. A total of 1,972 Hunters were produced by Hawker Siddeley and under licence.

Lightning (UK)



Click the name above to see prints featuring Lightning (UK) aircraft.

Manufacturer : BAC
Production Began : 1959
Retired : 1988
Number Built : 278

Lightning (UK)

English Electric (later BAC) Lightning. Originally designed by W F Petter (the designer of the Canberra) The first Lighting Prototype was first flown on the 4th August 1954 by Wing Commander R P Beamont at Boscombe Down. The second prototype P1A, The name of Lightning was not used until 1958) (WG763) was shown at the Farnborough show in September 1955. The Third prototype was flown in April 1957 and was the first British aircraft ever to fly at Mach 2 on the 25th November 1958 The first production aircraft made its first flight on 3rd November 1959 and entered operational service with the RAF on the 29th June 1960with |NO. 74 squadron based at Coltishall. The F1 was followed shortly after by the F1A which had been modified to carry a in-flight refueling probe. The Lightning F2 entered service in December 1962 with no 19 and 92 squadrons. a total of 44 aircraft F2 were built. The F3 came into service between 1964 and 1966 with Fighter Command squadrons, re engined with the Roll's Royce Avon 301 turbojets. The Lightning T Mk 5 was a training version Lightning a total of 22 were built between August 1964 and December 1966. The BAC Lighting F MK 6 was the last variant of the lightning, base don the F3, this was the last single seat fighter and served the |Royal Air Force for 20 years. First Flown on 17th April 1964, and a total of 55 F6 saw service with the Royal Air Force, and the last Lightning F6 was produced in August 1967. A Total of 278 lightning's of all marks were delivered. In 1974 the Phantom aircraft began replacing the aging Lightning's, but 2 F6 remained in service up to 1988 with Strike Command until finally being replaced with Tornado's. Specifications for MK1 to 4: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston and Samlesbury Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.1 (1390 mph) at 36,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. Specificaitons for MK 6: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.27 (1500 mph) at 40,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Range: 800 miles. Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. or Two Red Top. or two retractable contain 24 spin-stabilized rockets each.

Phantom

Click the name above to see prints featuring Phantom aircraft.

Manufacturer : McDonnell Douglas
Production Began : 1960
Retired : 1992
Number Built : 5195

Phantom

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber produced for the U.S. Navy by Mcdonnell Douglas. It became a major part of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and American Air Force. The Phantom F-4 saw service with all American forces during the Vietnam war serving as a fighter and ground attack aircraft. The Phantom first saw service in 1960 but continued in service until the 1980s (being replaced by the F-15 and F-16 ) The last Phantoms saw service during the Gulf war in 1991 being used for reconnaissance. Other nations also used the Phantom to great success. The Israeli Air Force used them during various Arab-Israeli wars and the Phantom also saw service in the Iranian Air Force during the Iran Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built. The Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy flew versions based on the F-4. The British Phantoms were powered by Rolls Royce Spey engines and also received British avionics, under the names pf Phantom FG.1 and Phantom FGR.2. The last British Phantoms served with 74 Squadron until they were dispanded in 1992.

Aviation History Timeline : 11th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
11December1928Gustav Dorr, a WW1 Ace with 35.00 victories, died on this day
11December1943Johannes Bunzek, a WW2 Ace with 75.00 victories, died on this day
11December1943Knight's Cross recipient Johannes Bunzek of 7./Jagdgeschwader 52 died on this day
11December1943Rudolf Wagner, a WW2 Ace with 81.00 victories, died on this day
11December1974E Lussier, a WW1 Ace with 9.00 victories, died on this day
11December1986Air Chief Marshal Sir Augustus Walker GCB CBE DSO DFC AFC, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
11December2006Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. R. Toombs of 236 Squadron, Passed away.
11December2006J R Toombs, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day

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