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Flt. Lt. George Fenton

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Joined the RAF as a cadet at RAF College Cranwell in March 1966. He served with 29 and 11 Sqn as a Lightning pilot. He then converted to the Converted to F4 Phantom in 1975 and flew with 892 Naval Air squadron aboard HMS Ark Royal before returning to the RAF with 29 Sqn. In 1980 George went to RAF Chivenor as an instructor on the Hawk and remained there as a QWI until retirement from the service in 1985. Spent the next few years instructing in the middle east. First in Qatar then in Saudi Arabia. Returned to the UK in 1999 to join the instructional staff at the BAE operated Hawk simulator at RAF Valley.

Items Signed by Flt. Lt. George Fenton

 A pair of 29 Squadron Lightning F.Mk3s tuck their gear up and head skyward from the Wattisham tarmac in the summer of 1972. ......
QRA Scramble by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Price : £240.00
A pair of 29 Squadron Lightning F.Mk3s tuck their gear up and head skyward from the Wattisham tarmac in the summer of 1972. ......

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  High in its element, a lone BAE Lightning F.6 glints in the evening sunshine as it returns from a sortie over the North Sea in the late 1970s. ......
The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Price : £230.00
High in its element, a lone BAE Lightning F.6 glints in the evening sunshine as it returns from a sortie over the North Sea in the late 1970s. ......

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Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as th......Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown.
Price : £115.00
Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as th......

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 Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as t......Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown (AP)
Price : £145.00
Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as t......

Quantity:
 Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as t......Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown. (W)
Price : £55.00
Lightning F. Mk 1As of 56 Squadron on a pilot training sortie during 1963. During the early 1960s many Lightning squadrons gave their aircraft colourful paint schemes, none was more striking than 56 Squadron (The Firebirds), who in 1963 doubled as t......

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  10th May 1988 - the retirement of the English Electric Lightning. ......
Binbrook Finale by D Mahoney. (B)
Price : £140.00
10th May 1988 - the retirement of the English Electric Lightning. ......

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Lightning Strike by Keith Aspinall. (B)
Price : £180.00
......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flt. Lt. George Fenton


Lightning Aviation Art Print Pack.
Pack Price : £280.00
Saving : £305
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown.
Thunder & Lightnings by Gerald Coulson.
The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman.
Portrait of Power by Keith Woodcock.

Quantity:

Two Lightning Aircraft Prints by Ivan Berryman and Stephen Brown.
Pack Price : £130.00
Saving : £195
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman.
Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown.
QRA Scramble by Ivan Berryman.

Quantity:
English Electric Lightning Prints by Stephen Brown and Gerald Coulson.
Pack Price : £260.00
Saving : £155
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Lightning Tribute by Stephen Brown.
Thunder & Lightnings by Gerald Coulson.

Quantity:
Flt. Lt. George Fenton

Squadrons for : Flt. Lt. George Fenton
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flt. Lt. George Fenton. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.11 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 14th December 1915
Fate : On 29th March 2007, XI(F) Squadron reformed at RAF Coningsby flying the Typhoon F.2 as the lead multi-role Typhoon squadron.

Ociores acrierosque aquilis - Swifter and keener than eagles

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.11 Sqn RAF

No.11 Sqn RAF

Formed at Netheravon on 14 February 1915 from a nucleus provided by No. 7 Squadron, No. 11 Squadron claims to be the first RFC unit specifically equipped as a scout unit. By the time the squadron moved to St Omer, France in July, it was equipped with the Vickers 'Gunbus' and was quickly pressed into action. Second Lieutenant G. S. M. Insall of the squadron being awarded a Victoria Cross for an action on 7 November 1915 in which he forced down and destroyed a German Aviatik observation aircraft.and destroying it with a well-aimed incendiary bomb, his aircraft was then damaged by ground fire. After force landing the aircraft, Insall and his observer/gunner repaired a fuel leak and flew back to base the following morning. In May 1917, the squadron became involved in offensive patrols, and joined the Army of Occupation after the Armistice, returning to the UK in late 1919 prior to disbanding shortly after. No. 11 Squadron numbered 19 flying aces in its ranks during the war. Among them were Victoria Cross winner Lionel Rees, as well as Andrew Edward McKeever, future Air Commodore John Stanley Chick, Eugene Coler, Albert Ball VC, Frederick Libby, Ronald Maudit, John Quested, Herbert Sellars, Donald Beard, Stephen Price, Hugh Hay, and Thomas Frederick Stephenson Reformed at Andover in January 1923, the Squadron spent short periods on communications and day bombing duties before moving to Risalpur, India and equipping with Wapitis and the a modified version of the Hart bomber. By the time war broke out in 1939, the Squadron had received Blenheims, and was transferred to Aden at the outset of the East Africa campaign. Following action in variety of operations, No. 11 Squadron moved to Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), in early 1942 and was involved in a number of unsuccessful attacks on Japanese ships. During 1943, the Squadron moved to Burma (now Myanmar) and used its newly arrived Hurricane ground-attack aircraft in support of the XIVth Army. With the surrender of Japan in August 1945, the Squadron moved to Japan as part of the Commonwealth occupation forces, remaining there until disbanded in February 1948. Reformed in Germany during October 1949, the Squadron spent several short periods with fighters of the period, Mosquitos, Vampires and Venoms until again disbanding during 1957, only to reform yet again in January 1959 with Meteor night fighters. Three years later, Javelins replaced the Meteors and these remained on strength until once again No. 11 Squadron was disbanded in 1966. Reforming in early 1967 with Lightnings, the Squadron spent the next 17 years flying this aircraft, until disbanding in May 1988, prior to reforming at Leeming three months later with the Tornado F3. In Oct 2005, after another period of 17 years, the Squadron once again disbanded. XI Squadron reformed at RAF Coningsby on 29 Mar 07 as the second frontline Typhoon squadron to form. As multi-role lead squadron, it spearheads the development of Typhoons air-to-surface capability. The Squadrons Battle honours are Western Front 19151918, Loos, Somme 1916, Arras, Cambrai 1917, Somme 1918, Amiens, Hindenburg Line, North-West Frontier 19301931, North-West Frontier 19351939, East Africa 1940, Egypt and Libya 19401942, Greece 1941, Syria 1941, Ceylon April 1942, Arakan 19431944, North Burma 19431944, Manipur 1944, Burma 19441945.

No.29 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 7th November 1915

Impiger et acer - Energetic and keen

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.29 Sqn RAF

No.29 Sqn RAF

No 29 Squadron was formed at Gosport on 7 November 1915 from a nucleus supplied by No 23 Squadron, and after training moved to France in March 1916 as the third squadron to be fully equipped with fighters. Its DH2s were engaged in escort duties to protect the slow and vulnerable reconnaissance aircraft over the Western Front ,By late 1916 the DH.2 was outclassed by new German fighters, but No. 29 kept its pushers until March 1917, when it was re-equipped with Nieuport 17s. These were replaced with later Nieuport types, such as the Nieuport 24bis, as these became available. Due to a shortage of the Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a the squadron retained its Nieuports until April 1918, being replaced by SE5As, which were used for the rest of the war on fighter and ground -attack missions. After a short period in Germany, the squadron Squadron was reduced to a cadre and in August 1919 returned to Spittlegate in the UK, in August 1919 where it was disbanded on 31 December 1919. The squadron was reformed on 1 April 1923, initially equipped with Sopwith Snipes. These were replaced by Gloster Grebes in January 1925, In turn, these were replaced by the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin IIIA in March 1928 and Bristol Bulldogs in June 1932. In March 1935, the squadron received two-seater Hawker Demons, which it operated until 1938. This included service in Egypt from October 1935 to 1936, during the Abyssinian crisis. The squadron also operated a few old Fairey Gordons for night patrols in Egypt. No 29 began the Second World War with its Blenheims, which at the period operated as day fighters especially on convoy protection patrols. From June 1940 it became a night fighter squadron, receiving some of the first Beaufighters in November, though it was February 1941 before the squadron was fully equipped with the new fighter. Various marks of the de Havilland Mosquito were flown by the squadron from May 1943 culminating in the Mosquito NF30. From the middle of 1944 most of the squadrons missions took it over the continent. The Mosquitoes continued to serve until replaced by Meteors in August 1951 at Tangmere. In January 1957 the squadron Squadron moved north, first to Northumberland and then in July 1958 to Scotland, conversion to Javelins taking having taken place in November 1957. In February 1963, No 29 was moved to Cyprus and in December 1965 went detached to Zambia for nine months on detachmentduring the Rhodesian crisis. In May 1967 the squadron Squadron returned to the UK to become are-equip with Lightnings squadron, disbanding on 31 December 1974. No 29 reformed at Coningsby as a Phantom squadron on 1 January 1975. A detachment was provided for the defence of the Falklands as soon as the airfield at Stanley was capable of operating Phantoms at the endin August of 1982. This became No 23 Squadron in March 1983 The Squadron swapped its Phantoms for Tornado F3 fighters in 1987 remaining at Coningsby until disbanded in October 1998. Five years later, the squadron was reformed, this time as the Typhoon operational conversion unit (OCU) based at BAE Systems' Warton airfield. In April 1987, No 29 Squadron became the first operational squadron to be equipped with the Tornado F3, deploying to Saudi Arabia after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990 and flying throughout Operation DESERT STORM in the air-defence role. The Squadron was again disbanded in October 1998.

No.892 Sqn FAA

Country : UK
Fleet Air Arm. First Squadron to fly the Sea Vixen aircraft.

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.892 Sqn FAA
No.892 Sqn FAA

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Flt. Lt. George Fenton
A list of all aircraft associated with Flt. Lt. George Fenton. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Hawk



Click the name above to see prints featuring Hawk aircraft.

Manufacturer : BAE Systems.
Production Began : 1974
Retired : 0
Number Built : 1050

Hawk

The BAe Hawk News of the first flight of the Hawk on 21 August 1974 was greeted with derision by Hunter pilots at the RAF's tactical weapons training unit. For understandably selfish reasons they were sceptical about the ability of the Hawk to replace the rugged, versatile and much-loved Hunter. "Forget Hawk - Fly Hunter" was one typical bumper sticker of the time but now 25 years on, such scepticism seems barely credible. With the arrival of the first Hawk aircraft at RAF Valley in November 1976, a new era of flying training began, and the first of thousands of fast-jet pilots discovered the joys of flying this truly thoroughbred aircraft. Since then, the BAe Hawk has earned a reputation as the world's best advanced trainer and light strike aircraft. The basic design has been refined and improved in a series of variants ranging from multi-role light fighter to the US Navy's carrier trainer. But the one quality that sets the Hawk apart from other aircraft is handling characteristics. In the on pilots own words, - "I had flown the Gnat and Hunter and in 1979 had just finished flying Canberra PR9s before transferring to the Jaguar, when I was given the opportunity to get some flying on the Hawk. It was a revelation. Here was an aircraft that was pure joy to fly, at low level it settled comfortably at 450 knots at around 150 feet and it could be flown into valleys under the most frightening weather safe in the knowledge that it could be turned around without losing airspeed almost in its own length. And at medium level? 1v1 combat in this aircraft is something else, - compared with the Hawk, the Jaguar is like flying an anvil".

Lightning (UK)



Click the name above to see prints featuring Lightning (UK) aircraft.

Manufacturer : BAC
Production Began : 1959
Retired : 1988
Number Built : 278

Lightning (UK)

English Electric (later BAC) Lightning. Originally designed by W F Petter (the designer of the Canberra) The first Lighting Prototype was first flown on the 4th August 1954 by Wing Commander R P Beamont at Boscombe Down. The second prototype P1A, The name of Lightning was not used until 1958) (WG763) was shown at the Farnborough show in September 1955. The Third prototype was flown in April 1957 and was the first British aircraft ever to fly at Mach 2 on the 25th November 1958 The first production aircraft made its first flight on 3rd November 1959 and entered operational service with the RAF on the 29th June 1960with |NO. 74 squadron based at Coltishall. The F1 was followed shortly after by the F1A which had been modified to carry a in-flight refueling probe. The Lightning F2 entered service in December 1962 with no 19 and 92 squadrons. a total of 44 aircraft F2 were built. The F3 came into service between 1964 and 1966 with Fighter Command squadrons, re engined with the Roll's Royce Avon 301 turbojets. The Lightning T Mk 5 was a training version Lightning a total of 22 were built between August 1964 and December 1966. The BAC Lighting F MK 6 was the last variant of the lightning, base don the F3, this was the last single seat fighter and served the |Royal Air Force for 20 years. First Flown on 17th April 1964, and a total of 55 F6 saw service with the Royal Air Force, and the last Lightning F6 was produced in August 1967. A Total of 278 lightning's of all marks were delivered. In 1974 the Phantom aircraft began replacing the aging Lightning's, but 2 F6 remained in service up to 1988 with Strike Command until finally being replaced with Tornado's. Specifications for MK1 to 4: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston and Samlesbury Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.1 (1390 mph) at 36,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. Specificaitons for MK 6: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.27 (1500 mph) at 40,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Range: 800 miles. Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. or Two Red Top. or two retractable contain 24 spin-stabilized rockets each.

Phantom

Click the name above to see prints featuring Phantom aircraft.

Manufacturer : McDonnell Douglas
Production Began : 1960
Retired : 1992
Number Built : 5195

Phantom

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber produced for the U.S. Navy by Mcdonnell Douglas. It became a major part of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and American Air Force. The Phantom F-4 saw service with all American forces during the Vietnam war serving as a fighter and ground attack aircraft. The Phantom first saw service in 1960 but continued in service until the 1980s (being replaced by the F-15 and F-16 ) The last Phantoms saw service during the Gulf war in 1991 being used for reconnaissance. Other nations also used the Phantom to great success. The Israeli Air Force used them during various Arab-Israeli wars and the Phantom also saw service in the Iranian Air Force during the Iran Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built. The Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy flew versions based on the F-4. The British Phantoms were powered by Rolls Royce Spey engines and also received British avionics, under the names pf Phantom FG.1 and Phantom FGR.2. The last British Phantoms served with 74 Squadron until they were dispanded in 1992.

Aviation History Timeline : 18th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
18December1941Feldwebel Gerhard Kppen of 7./Jagdgeschwader 52 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1941Hauptmann Theodor Triebe of 1./Flak-Regiment 7 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1941Oberleutnant Matthias Schwegler of I./Kampfgeschwader 51 was awarded the Knight's Cross
18December1944Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O D. M. Crook of 609 Squadron, was Killed.
18December1959Gerald Maxwell, a WW1 Ace with 21.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Hans Hahn, a WW2 Ace with 108.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Hans Rudel, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
18December1982Hans-Ulrich Rudel, a WW2 Ace with 11.00 victories, died on this day
18December1982Knight's Cross recipient Hans-Ulrich Rudel of 9./Sturzkampfgeschwader 2 died on this day
18December2007Lawrence ONeill, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
18December2008Air Commodore Peter Brothers CBE, DSO, DFC*, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
18December2008Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/Lt. P. M. Brothers of 32 & 257 Squadrons, Passed away.
18December2008Peter Brothers, a WW2 Ace with 15.00 victories, died on this day

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