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Air Marshal Sir William Wratten KBE, CB, AFC, FRAeS

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Air Marshal Wratten joined the RAF as a Cranwell Cadet, graduating in December 1960. He completed the CFS course the following year and went on to instruct as a first-tour QFI on Vampire T11s at Oakington and Swinderby. The Air Marshal converted onto Lightning at Middleton-St-George in 1963 before serving on 19 Squadron from 1964 to 1968, first at Leconfield and later Gutersloh. In 1968 Air Marshal Wratten converted to Phantoms at Davis-Monthan AFB, USA, and then instructed on 288 (Phantom) OCU from 1968 to 1970. He was posted in 1971 as Flight Commander on 17 Squadron at RAF Bruggen, operating the Phantom in the Strike / Attack role. Returning to the UK in 1973, he joined the staff on HQ 38 Group before attending the RAF Staff College in 1974. He then joined the OR staff at the Minstry of Defence for a brief spell before being promoted to Wing Commander and, in 1975 taking command of 23 Squadron with the Phantom in AD role. On completing his tour as Officer Commanding 23 Squadron, Air Marshal Wratten was posted to the Air Secretarys staff at Barnwood before being promoted to Group Captain in 1980 and taking command of RAF Coningsby. In June 1982 he moved to the Falkland Islands to form and command RAF Stanley. After attending RCDS in 1983, the Air Marshal became one of the two Directors OR (Air) being concerned with future RAF aircraft (except Nimrod AEW) and offensive weapons systems. In September 1986 he was appointed SASO HQ 1 Group, a post he held until becoming AOC 11 Group on 17th March 1989. Between 14th November 1990 and 22nd March 1991, Air Marshal Wratten was detached to HQ British Forces Middle East in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where he held the appointments of Air Commander and Deputy British Forces Commander Middle East during the Gulf conflict. In recognition of this service he received a Knighthood in the Operation GRANBY Honours List. On 19th September 1991, Sir William was promoted to Air Marshal prior to taking up his appointment as Director General Saudi Armed Forces Project.



Items Signed by Air Marshal Sir William Wratten KBE, CB, AFC, FRAeS

at 2200 GMT on 16th January 1991 Tornados were launched from Dhahran, Bahrain and Tabuk on the RAFs first combat missions in Operation Desert Storm.  Each Tornado was loaded with two JP23s and all were bound for airfields in Iraq.  Taking the defence......RAF Tornado- Operation Desert Storm 1991 by Frank Wootton.
Price : £120.00
at 2200 GMT on 16th January 1991 Tornados were launched from Dhahran, Bahrain and Tabuk on the RAFs first combat missions in Operation Desert Storm. Each Tornado was loaded with two JP23s and all were bound for airfields in Iraq. Taking the defence......

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Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Air Marshal Sir William Wratten KBE, CB, AFC, FRAeS

Air Marshal Sir William Wratten KBE, CB, AFC, FRAeS

Squadrons for : Air Marshal Sir William Wratten KBE, CB, AFC, FRAeS
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Air Marshal Sir William Wratten KBE, CB, AFC, FRAeS. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.17 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st February 1915

Excellere contende - Strive to excel

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.17 Sqn RAF

No.17 Sqn RAF

No 17 Squadron was formed at Gosport on 1 February 1915 and after a period of training embarked for Egypt in November. On 24 December, it began to make reconnaissance flights over the Turkish lines in Sinai, also flying in support of troops engaged with Turkish army units in the Western Desert. Detachments were also to be found in Arabia until July 1916, when the Squadron was sent to Salonika as a mixed unit of twelve BE2cs for reconnaissance and a scout component of two DH2s and three Bristol Scouts. At first it was the only RFC unit in Macedonia but was later joined by others in April 1918, handed over its fighters to a newly-formed No 150 Squadron. For the rest of the war, it was engaged in tactical reconnaissance and artillery spotting on the Bulgarian border. In December 1918, the squadron re-equipped with twelve DH9s and six Camels, sending A Flight to Batum to support the White Russian forces and B and C Flights to Constantinople in January 1919. On 14 November 1919, No 17 was disbanded. Reforming at Hawkinge on 1 April 1924, with Snipes No 17 formed part of the fighter defence of the UK until the outbreak of World War Two. Successively equipped Woodcocks, Siskins, Bulldogs and Gauntlets, the squadron remained in the UK during the Abyssinian crisis but lost most of its Bulldogs as reinforcements for squadrons moving to the Middle East and had to fly Harts for a period. In June 1939 Hurricanes were received and flew defensive patrols until the German attack on France in May 1940. Fighter sweeps were then flown over the Netherlands, Belgium and French airfields to cover the retreat of allied troops. In June the squadron moved to Brittany as the remnants of BEF and RAF units in France were evacuated, retiring to the Channel Islands two days before returning to the UK. No 17 flew over southern England throughout the Battle of Britain, being moved to northern Scotland in April 1941. In November 1941, the squadron sailed for the Far East where war broke out in December. Diverted to Burma, it arrived in January 1942, as Japanese troops neared Rangoon. Defensive patrols were flown until the Rangoon airfields were overrun and No 17 moved north, eventually being cut off from India while operating from Lashio. The surviving aircraft were flown out and the ground personnel made their way across Burma to the Indian border. By the end of May, the squadron had re-assembled at Calcutta and in June received aircraft again for the defence of the area. Ground attack missions began in February 1943 and continued until August, when the squadron moved to Ceylon. Spitfires began to arrive in March 1944 and were taken back to the Burma front in November to fly escort and ground attack missions. In June 1945, it was withdrawn to prepare for the invasion of Malaya and was taken by carrier to the landing beaches near Penang in early September soon after the Japanese capitulation. On 11 February 1949, No 691 Squadron based at Chivenor for anti-aircraft co-operation duties was renumbered No 17 Squadron, being officially disbanded on 13 March 1951, passing its tasks to No 3 CAACU which was formed five days later. No 17 reformed at Wahn on 1 June 1956 as a Canberra photographic reconnaissance squadron in Germany, disbanding on 31 December 1969. On 1 September 1970, No 17 reformed at Bruggen with Phantoms, which were flown until December 1975. Conversion to Jaguars began in September. In January 1985 the squadron began to convert to Tornado GR1s, the Jaguar element disbanding on 1 March 1985 when No 17 became fully equipped with Tornados. In 2003 No 17 became the first RAF squadron to receive the Eurofighter Typhoon. Based a Warton it's responsibilities include the evaluation of the new aircraft and its integration into full squadron service. On 19 May 2005, the Squadron officially reformed with the presentation of the Squadron Standard at RAF Coningsby in Lincolnshire, to become No 17 (Reserve) Squadron, the Typhoon Operational Evaluation Unit.

No.19 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915

Possunt quia posse videntur - They can because they think they can

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No.19 Sqn RAF

o. 19 Squadron was formed from a nucleus provided by No. 5 Reserve Squadron at Castle Bromwich on 1 September 1915. It was almost a year later that the Squadron went to France, flying contact patrols with BE12s before re-equipping with French-built Spads. These were used to strafe ground troops during the battles at Arras, Messines Ridge and Ypres. Early in 1918, Sopwith Dolphins arrived and these were used in bomber escort duties. A year after the end of the War, the Squadron was disbanded reforming on 1 April 1924 at Duxford. The Squadron remained at Duxford throughout the inter-war years with a succession of fighters: Siskins, Bulldogs and Gauntlets receiving Spitifre on the 4th August 1938 The Squadron was stationed in the UK after the outbreak of the Second World War,the Squadron fought well over the evacuation at Dunkirk where they lost 4 aircraft for the destruction of 13 E.A.'s. The Squadron destroyed 2 He 111's on the night of the 19th of June 1940, and was part of No. 12 Group RAF, RAF Fighter Command, during the Battle of Britain. 19 Squadron formed part of the Duxford Wing, 12 Group's 'Big Wing' formation. Later versions of Spitfires were flown until the arrival of Mustangs for close-support duties in early 1944. After D-Day, No. 19 briefly went across the English Channel before starting long-range escort duties from RAF Peterhead for Coastal Command off the coast of Norway. After world war two the squadron flew at first de Havilland Hornets and later a variety of jet fighter aircraft including the Hawker Hunter fighter then re-equipping with English Electric Lightning, (1962 - 1964) at that time 19 Sqdn was based at RAF Station Leconfield. The Squadron and the sister Squadron 92 were called upon as fast response interceptors during the "cold war", later being disbanded on 9 January 1992. Their final location before being disbanded was RAF Wildenrath in Germany near Geilenkirchen

No.23 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915
Fate : The squadron disbanded on 2 October 2009, when it amalgamated with No 8 Squadron.

Semper aggessus - Always having attacked

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.23 Sqn RAF

No.23 Sqn RAF

o. 23 Squadron formed at Fort Grange, Gosport on 1 Sep 1915 under the command of one of the RAF's most experienced operational pilots - Captain Louis Strange. After a brief period attempting to counter German airship flights over London, the Squadron moved to France with its FE2Bs initially employed on escort duties. By early 1917, Spad single-seaters had arrived, and were being used on offensive patrols over the front and low-level strafing attacks against German troops By the end of the War, the Squadron had converted to Dolphins, and flew these until disbanded at the end of 1919. On 1 July 1925, No. 23 Squadron reformed at Henlow with Snipes, but these were replaced shortly after with Gloster Gamecocks. In 1931, the Squadron was tasked with carrying out trials on the new Hawker Hart two-seaters, taking the production version, known as Demons, on strength in 1933 n 1938 it became a night-fighter squadron using the Bristol Blenheim. Following the outbreak of the Second World War, these were replaced by the Douglas Havoc and later the de Havilland Mosquito. Between 1942 and 1944 the squadron was based on Malta. It then returned to England and served as an intruder squadron, targeting German night fighters, over western Europe. 23 Sqn was disbanded, following the war's end, in September 1945 The squadron was reformed on 1 September 1946 as a night fighter squadron operating the de Havilland Mosquito.[8] It received jet aircraft in the form of de Havilland Vampire NF.10s in 1953, replacing them with de Havilland Venom NF.2s in June 1954. The squadron acquired Venom NF.3 in 1957.but was soon replaced with Gloster Javelin all-weather fighter, beginning a long period operating in the air defence role. The squadron has a strong heritage in the air defence role, operating Gloster Javelins, Lightnings, Phantoms and Tornado F3s. The squadron first acquired Phantoms on 1 November 1975 at RAF Coningsby before moving to RAF Wattisham for just under 10 years. Then in October 1983 the squadron deployed to Stanley airfield, Falkland Islands after their recapture from Argentina, arriving there on 1 November. They remained here until 31 October 1988 when its duty was assumed by 1435 Flight. The squadron then reformed on 1 November 1988 at RAF Leeming with the Panavia Tornado which it operated until 26 February 1994, when the unit was disbanded. The squadron assumed the Airborne Early Warning role upon reformation in April 1996, sharing the RAF's Sentry AEW1 fleet with No. 8 Squadron. The squadron disbanded on 2 October 2009, when it amalgamated with No 8 Squadron.
Aircraft for : Air Marshal Sir William Wratten KBE, CB, AFC, FRAeS
A list of all aircraft associated with Air Marshal Sir William Wratten KBE, CB, AFC, FRAeS. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Lightning (UK)



Click the name above to see prints featuring Lightning (UK) aircraft.

Manufacturer : BAC
Production Began : 1959
Retired : 1988
Number Built : 278

Lightning (UK)

English Electric (later BAC) Lightning. Originally designed by W F Petter (the designer of the Canberra) The first Lighting Prototype was first flown on the 4th August 1954 by Wing Commander R P Beamont at Boscombe Down. The second prototype P1A, The name of Lightning was not used until 1958) (WG763) was shown at the Farnborough show in September 1955. The Third prototype was flown in April 1957 and was the first British aircraft ever to fly at Mach 2 on the 25th November 1958 The first production aircraft made its first flight on 3rd November 1959 and entered operational service with the RAF on the 29th June 1960with |NO. 74 squadron based at Coltishall. The F1 was followed shortly after by the F1A which had been modified to carry a in-flight refueling probe. The Lightning F2 entered service in December 1962 with no 19 and 92 squadrons. a total of 44 aircraft F2 were built. The F3 came into service between 1964 and 1966 with Fighter Command squadrons, re engined with the Roll's Royce Avon 301 turbojets. The Lightning T Mk 5 was a training version Lightning a total of 22 were built between August 1964 and December 1966. The BAC Lighting F MK 6 was the last variant of the lightning, base don the F3, this was the last single seat fighter and served the |Royal Air Force for 20 years. First Flown on 17th April 1964, and a total of 55 F6 saw service with the Royal Air Force, and the last Lightning F6 was produced in August 1967. A Total of 278 lightning's of all marks were delivered. In 1974 the Phantom aircraft began replacing the aging Lightning's, but 2 F6 remained in service up to 1988 with Strike Command until finally being replaced with Tornado's. Specifications for MK1 to 4: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston and Samlesbury Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.1 (1390 mph) at 36,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. Specificaitons for MK 6: Made by English Electrc Aviation Ltd at Preston Lancashire, designated P1B, All Weather single seat Fighter. Max Speed: Mach 2.27 (1500 mph) at 40,000 feet Ceiling 55,000 feet Range: 800 miles. Armament: Two 30mm Aden guns and Two Firestreak infra red AAM's. or Two Red Top. or two retractable contain 24 spin-stabilized rockets each.

Phantom

Click the name above to see prints featuring Phantom aircraft.

Manufacturer : McDonnell Douglas
Production Began : 1960
Retired : 1992
Number Built : 5195

Phantom

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber produced for the U.S. Navy by Mcdonnell Douglas. It became a major part of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and American Air Force. The Phantom F-4 saw service with all American forces during the Vietnam war serving as a fighter and ground attack aircraft. The Phantom first saw service in 1960 but continued in service until the 1980s (being replaced by the F-15 and F-16 ) The last Phantoms saw service during the Gulf war in 1991 being used for reconnaissance. Other nations also used the Phantom to great success. The Israeli Air Force used them during various Arab-Israeli wars and the Phantom also saw service in the Iranian Air Force during the Iran Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built. The Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy flew versions based on the F-4. The British Phantoms were powered by Rolls Royce Spey engines and also received British avionics, under the names pf Phantom FG.1 and Phantom FGR.2. The last British Phantoms served with 74 Squadron until they were dispanded in 1992.

Vampire

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Vampire

Full profile not yet available.

Aviation History Timeline : 12th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O A. W. N. Britton of 263 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. H. Harrison of 145 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O W. H. DFM & Bar Franklin of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, S/L G. W. Montagu of 236 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. M. H. Hine of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. R. S. Hutton of 85 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. R. V. Hogg of 616 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. J. F. H. Bandinel of 3 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. K. Pollard of 232 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former Canadian Battle of Britain pilot, P/O A. L. Edy of 602 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1941Former Polish Battle of Britain pilot, F/O B. Groszewski of 43 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, F/O G. Ashfield of F.I.U., was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O G. A. Denby of 600 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. C. R. Hewlett of 65 Squadron, was Killed.
12December1942Former Canadian Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt E. G. Ford of 3 and 232 Squadrons, was Killed.
12December1944Alexander Preinfalk, a WW2 Ace with 76.00 victories, died on this day
12December1944Knight's Cross recipient Alexander Preinfalk of 5./Jagdgeschwader 77 died on this day
12December1945William Tipton, a WW1 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
12December2006Knight's Cross recipient Hans-Karl Stepp of 7./Sturzkampfgeschwader 2 died on this day
12December2006Oberstleutnant Hans-Karl Stepp, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
12December2006Wing Commander R C Dick Cresswell, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
12December2007Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O E. G. Barwell of 264 & 242 Squadrons, Passed away.
12December2007Joe Robbins, a WW2 Ace with 5.00 victories, died on this day
12December2007Wing Commander Eric Barwell, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day

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