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Flt Lt Pete Underwood

Pete Underwood joined the RAF Officer Training College Cranwell in 1980. His first operational tour was from 1984 to 1986 on the Phantom FGR2, 19 Squadron, RAF Wildenrath in Germany. He was detached to No.23 Sqn for a 6-month duty in the Falkland Islands during this tour. His second operational tour was from 1986 to 1989 on the Phantom FG1, 111 Sqn, RAF Leuchars. After this tour he was posted to RAF Brawdy as a Tactics and Weapons Instructor on the Hawk TMk1. When RAF Brawdy closed he moved on to RAF Chivenor as OC Weapons Instruction Flight on the Hawk TMk1. He now flies as Captain on the Airbus A320/321 with Monarch Airlines Ltd.

Items Signed by Flt Lt Pete Underwood

 At the height of the Cold War during the 1970s and through the 80s, low level, fast-jet training sorties were absolutely crucial to Britains air defences. This was an era of the true, thoroughbred supersonic jet fighter like arguably the greatest of......
Phantom Country by Simon Atack.
Price : £90.00
At the height of the Cold War during the 1970s and through the 80s, low level, fast-jet training sorties were absolutely crucial to Britains air defences. This was an era of the true, thoroughbred supersonic jet fighter like arguably the greatest of......

Quantity:
 At the height of the Cold War during the 1970s and through the 80s, low level, fast-jet training sorties were absolutely crucial to Britains air defences. This was an era of the true, thoroughbred supersonic jet fighter like arguably the greatest of......
Phantom Country by Simon Atack. (AP)
Price : £125.00
At the height of the Cold War during the 1970s and through the 80s, low level, fast-jet training sorties were absolutely crucial to Britains air defences. This was an era of the true, thoroughbred supersonic jet fighter like arguably the greatest of......

Quantity:

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flt Lt Pete Underwood

Flt Lt Pete Underwood

Squadrons for : Flt Lt Pete Underwood
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flt Lt Pete Underwood. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.111 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st August 1917

Adstantes - Standing by

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.111 Sqn RAF

No.111 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.19 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915

Possunt quia posse videntur - They can because they think they can

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.19 Sqn RAF

No.19 Sqn RAF

o. 19 Squadron was formed from a nucleus provided by No. 5 Reserve Squadron at Castle Bromwich on 1 September 1915. It was almost a year later that the Squadron went to France, flying contact patrols with BE12s before re-equipping with French-built Spads. These were used to strafe ground troops during the battles at Arras, Messines Ridge and Ypres. Early in 1918, Sopwith Dolphins arrived and these were used in bomber escort duties. A year after the end of the War, the Squadron was disbanded reforming on 1 April 1924 at Duxford. The Squadron remained at Duxford throughout the inter-war years with a succession of fighters: Siskins, Bulldogs and Gauntlets receiving Spitifre on the 4th August 1938 The Squadron was stationed in the UK after the outbreak of the Second World War,the Squadron fought well over the evacuation at Dunkirk where they lost 4 aircraft for the destruction of 13 E.A.'s. The Squadron destroyed 2 He 111's on the night of the 19th of June 1940, and was part of No. 12 Group RAF, RAF Fighter Command, during the Battle of Britain. 19 Squadron formed part of the Duxford Wing, 12 Group's 'Big Wing' formation. Later versions of Spitfires were flown until the arrival of Mustangs for close-support duties in early 1944. After D-Day, No. 19 briefly went across the English Channel before starting long-range escort duties from RAF Peterhead for Coastal Command off the coast of Norway. After world war two the squadron flew at first de Havilland Hornets and later a variety of jet fighter aircraft including the Hawker Hunter fighter then re-equipping with English Electric Lightning, (1962 - 1964) at that time 19 Sqdn was based at RAF Station Leconfield. The Squadron and the sister Squadron 92 were called upon as fast response interceptors during the "cold war", later being disbanded on 9 January 1992. Their final location before being disbanded was RAF Wildenrath in Germany near Geilenkirchen

No.23 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st September 1915
Fate : The squadron disbanded on 2 October 2009, when it amalgamated with No 8 Squadron.

Semper aggessus - Always having attacked

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.23 Sqn RAF

No.23 Sqn RAF

o. 23 Squadron formed at Fort Grange, Gosport on 1 Sep 1915 under the command of one of the RAF's most experienced operational pilots - Captain Louis Strange. After a brief period attempting to counter German airship flights over London, the Squadron moved to France with its FE2Bs initially employed on escort duties. By early 1917, Spad single-seaters had arrived, and were being used on offensive patrols over the front and low-level strafing attacks against German troops By the end of the War, the Squadron had converted to Dolphins, and flew these until disbanded at the end of 1919. On 1 July 1925, No. 23 Squadron reformed at Henlow with Snipes, but these were replaced shortly after with Gloster Gamecocks. In 1931, the Squadron was tasked with carrying out trials on the new Hawker Hart two-seaters, taking the production version, known as Demons, on strength in 1933 n 1938 it became a night-fighter squadron using the Bristol Blenheim. Following the outbreak of the Second World War, these were replaced by the Douglas Havoc and later the de Havilland Mosquito. Between 1942 and 1944 the squadron was based on Malta. It then returned to England and served as an intruder squadron, targeting German night fighters, over western Europe. 23 Sqn was disbanded, following the war's end, in September 1945 The squadron was reformed on 1 September 1946 as a night fighter squadron operating the de Havilland Mosquito.[8] It received jet aircraft in the form of de Havilland Vampire NF.10s in 1953, replacing them with de Havilland Venom NF.2s in June 1954. The squadron acquired Venom NF.3 in 1957.but was soon replaced with Gloster Javelin all-weather fighter, beginning a long period operating in the air defence role. The squadron has a strong heritage in the air defence role, operating Gloster Javelins, Lightnings, Phantoms and Tornado F3s. The squadron first acquired Phantoms on 1 November 1975 at RAF Coningsby before moving to RAF Wattisham for just under 10 years. Then in October 1983 the squadron deployed to Stanley airfield, Falkland Islands after their recapture from Argentina, arriving there on 1 November. They remained here until 31 October 1988 when its duty was assumed by 1435 Flight. The squadron then reformed on 1 November 1988 at RAF Leeming with the Panavia Tornado which it operated until 26 February 1994, when the unit was disbanded. The squadron assumed the Airborne Early Warning role upon reformation in April 1996, sharing the RAF's Sentry AEW1 fleet with No. 8 Squadron. The squadron disbanded on 2 October 2009, when it amalgamated with No 8 Squadron.
Aircraft for : Flt Lt Pete Underwood
A list of all aircraft associated with Flt Lt Pete Underwood. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Hawk



Click the name above to see prints featuring Hawk aircraft.

Manufacturer : BAE Systems.
Production Began : 1974
Retired : 0
Number Built : 1050

Hawk

The BAe Hawk News of the first flight of the Hawk on 21 August 1974 was greeted with derision by Hunter pilots at the RAF's tactical weapons training unit. For understandably selfish reasons they were sceptical about the ability of the Hawk to replace the rugged, versatile and much-loved Hunter. "Forget Hawk - Fly Hunter" was one typical bumper sticker of the time but now 25 years on, such scepticism seems barely credible. With the arrival of the first Hawk aircraft at RAF Valley in November 1976, a new era of flying training began, and the first of thousands of fast-jet pilots discovered the joys of flying this truly thoroughbred aircraft. Since then, the BAe Hawk has earned a reputation as the world's best advanced trainer and light strike aircraft. The basic design has been refined and improved in a series of variants ranging from multi-role light fighter to the US Navy's carrier trainer. But the one quality that sets the Hawk apart from other aircraft is handling characteristics. In the on pilots own words, - "I had flown the Gnat and Hunter and in 1979 had just finished flying Canberra PR9s before transferring to the Jaguar, when I was given the opportunity to get some flying on the Hawk. It was a revelation. Here was an aircraft that was pure joy to fly, at low level it settled comfortably at 450 knots at around 150 feet and it could be flown into valleys under the most frightening weather safe in the knowledge that it could be turned around without losing airspeed almost in its own length. And at medium level? 1v1 combat in this aircraft is something else, - compared with the Hawk, the Jaguar is like flying an anvil".

Phantom

Click the name above to see prints featuring Phantom aircraft.

Manufacturer : McDonnell Douglas
Production Began : 1960
Retired : 1992
Number Built : 5195

Phantom

The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber produced for the U.S. Navy by Mcdonnell Douglas. It became a major part of the United States Navy, Marine Corps and American Air Force. The Phantom F-4 saw service with all American forces during the Vietnam war serving as a fighter and ground attack aircraft. The Phantom first saw service in 1960 but continued in service until the 1980s (being replaced by the F-15 and F-16 ) The last Phantoms saw service during the Gulf war in 1991 being used for reconnaissance. Other nations also used the Phantom to great success. The Israeli Air Force used them during various Arab-Israeli wars and the Phantom also saw service in the Iranian Air Force during the Iran Iraq War. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1981, with a total of 5,195 built. The Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy flew versions based on the F-4. The British Phantoms were powered by Rolls Royce Spey engines and also received British avionics, under the names pf Phantom FG.1 and Phantom FGR.2. The last British Phantoms served with 74 Squadron until they were dispanded in 1992.

Aviation History Timeline : 13th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
13December1918Julius Fichter, a WW1 Ace with 6.00 victories, died on this day
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, (F.A.A.) Lt. G. F. Russell of 804 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O A. H. Pettet of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. D. Dodd of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. H. W. Walmsly of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. S. Hamilton of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O H. J. Jeffcoat of 236 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. P. A. Dale of 141 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. B. J. E. DFC Lane of 19 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1969Viktor Bauer, a WW2 Ace with 106.00 victories, died on this day
13December2000Air Vice Marshal Sandy Johnstone CB DFC AE DL, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
13December2000Former British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. A. V. R. Johnstone DFC of 602 Squadron, Passed away.
13December2004Franz-Josef Beerenbrock, a WW2 Ace with 117.00 victories, died on this day
13December2004Franz-Josef Beerenbrock, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
13December2004Knight's Cross recipient Franz-Josef Beerenbrock of 10./Jagdgeschwader 51 died on this day

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