Airforce-Art .com Home Page
Order Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket



Last Christmas Post Dates (more)>
UK : 20 Dec, US/CAN/EUR : 18 Dec

Join us on Facebook!

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!
Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Artist
Search
Signature
Search
Air Force
Search
SPECIAL OFFERS

Product Search         

Wing Commander D A G Parry (deceased)

No Photo Available

Born in 1915 in England, George Parry was interested in aviation from an early age, and the daring exploits of the WW1 aces inspired the youngster with the ambition to become a flyer. Parry joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and flew on weekends and in his spare time. When War was declared against Germany, Parry was activated and was sent to 10 F.T.S. and 13 O.T.U. for training. Parry was posted to 110 Squadron at Wattisham, which was equipped with the Mk IV Bristol Blenheim. Parry flew daylight missions attacking Axis airfields and shipping. When cloud cover permitted, deeper penetration was possible. These attacks were carried out against Channel ports, and waterways on the continent. As the Luftwaffe shifted to night bombing emphasis, 110 Squadron shifted its emphasis to enemy airfields and industrial targets. Parry completed his combat tour in October of 1940, and was reassigned to 13 O.T.U. in Bicester in April. In October of 1941 Parry was posted to 105 Squadron in Swanton Morley. This Squadron was equipped with Mosquitoes shortly after Parry arrived. The Squadron was utilized for the first daylight bombing raid on Berlin. Many mission were flown against power stations, locomotive repair works, and other important industrial targets. These missions were typically low altitude, high speed raids, where the Mosquito's fast speed could be used to advantage. In September of 1942 Parry was selected to lead a daring daylight low altitude raid on the Gestapo Headquarters in Oslo, Norway. This mission was requested by Norwegian resistance officials to boost morale. One of the four aircraft which participated in the raid was forced to make a crash landing, while the other three aircraft returned unharmed. Parry also made many flights to Stockholm carrying diplomatic mail. On these missions Parry flew a Mosquito with civilian markings while carrying a civilian passport. In 1943 Parry completed his combat tour with 105 Squadron, and was thereafter posted to Headquarters Bomber Command. After a short assignment with O.T.U. at Silverstone, Parry was transferred to the 2nd Tactical Air Force. Parry assisted No 2. Group Squadrons in their conversion to the Mosquito, and then ran the O.T.U. at Bicester which provided aircrew training for the 2nd Tactical Air Force. His final assignments with the RAF were at H.Q. 12 Group and RAF Church Fenton. Following the war in 1947, Parry left the RAF, but remained in the Reserves. In civilian life Parry took up the occupation of structural engineer. Following thirty-two years in civilian life, Parry retired in 1979. While in the RAF Reserve, Parry commanded the Norfolk Air Training Corps from 1949 to 1956. He also commanded No. 3620 Fighter Control Unit of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, and was involved with the Norfolk Emergency Commission as its Scientific Adviser. Parry's decorations include the D.S.O., M.B.E., D.F.C., and A.E. Sadly he died in August 1999.


Awarded the Distinguished Service OrderAwarded the Distinguished Flying CrossAwarded a Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross
Distinguished
Service Order
Distinguished
Flying Cross
Bar to the
Distinguished
Flying Cross

Items Signed by Wing Commander D A G Parry (deceased)

 Although fifty years has passed since the end of WW II, the de Havilland Mosquito, or Mossie, is still held in high admiration by the crews which flew this wonderful aircraft. Built in a number of variants, the Mosquito served in a number of roles i......Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes. (B)
Price : £95.00
Although fifty years has passed since the end of WW II, the de Havilland Mosquito, or Mossie, is still held in high admiration by the crews which flew this wonderful aircraft. Built in a number of variants, the Mosquito served in a number of roles i......

Quantity:
 Although fifty years has passed since the end of WW II, the de Havilland Mosquito, or Mossie, is still held in high admiration by the crews which flew this wonderful aircraft. Built in a number of variants, the Mosquito served in a number of roles i......Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes. (C)
Price : £75.00
Although fifty years has passed since the end of WW II, the de Havilland Mosquito, or Mossie, is still held in high admiration by the crews which flew this wonderful aircraft. Built in a number of variants, the Mosquito served in a number of roles i......

Quantity:

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Wing Commander D A G Parry (deceased)

Mosquito Aircraft Prints by Anthony Saunders and Stan Stokes.
Pack Price : £130.00
Saving : £95
Aviation Print Pack. ......

Titles in this pack :

Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (C)
Those Nagging Mosquitoes by Stan Stokes. (B)

Quantity:
Wing Commander D A G Parry (deceased)

Squadrons for : Wing Commander D A G Parry (deceased)
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Wing Commander D A G Parry (deceased). A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.105 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 23rd September 1917
Fate : On 20 January 1968 the squadron disbanded for the last timein Bahrain

Fortis in proeliis - Valiant in battles

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.105 Sqn RAF

No.105 Sqn RAF

No 105 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Andover, Hampshire, in September 1917, and was originally intended as a bomber unit for service in France. In April 1918, however, plans were changed: it was ordered to mobilize as a corps reconnaissance squadron for service in Ireland and in May it proceeded to Omagh, Co. Tyrone, equipped with RE8 aircraft. In December 1918, it was re-equipped with Bristol Fighters. and 105 Squadron continued on duties in Ireland until 1 February 1920, when the squadron was disbanded by being re-numbered to 2 Squadron at Oranmore The squadron was formed again on 12 April 1937 at RAF Harwell from B Flight of 18 Squadron as a day bomber squadron. Its first equipment was the biplane Hawker Audax while it awaited delivery of the more modern monoplane Fairey Battle. The Battles arrived in August 1937 and 105 Squadron was one of the first to be operational on the type. At the start of the Second World War in September 1939, as part of the Advanced Air Striking Force, the squadron moved to France, initially on reconnaissance missions along the France-German border. The Germans invaded France in May 1940 and the squadron was soon busy attacking the advancing German troops. One of the most important targets was the bombing of the bridges over the River Meuse in attempt to slow down the German advance. It suffered heavily from the attention of German fighters and the squadron had to retire back to England in June 1940. At RAF Honington the squadron was re-equipped with the Bristol Blenheim to join 2 Group's offensive against the invasion ports and German shipping. The squadron had many losses particularly from the German Flak ships. In October 1940 part of the squadron was detached to Malta to carry out attacks on Axis shipping in the Mediterranean Sea. It moved to RAF Swanton Morley in Norfolk. After losing its commanding officer in a raid near Stavanger in 1941, it gained a new CO, Wing Commander H.I. Edwards. For his part in planning and leading a low level daylight attack on the port of Bremen he was awarded the Victoria Cross. In October 1941 the Malta detachment returned to England and the squadron began to operate at a reduced level. The reason for the reduction in sorties was the squadron had been chosen to be the first to use the Mosquito Mk.IV and was concentrating on training. In December the squadron moved to RAF Horsham St Faith near Norwich. The first Mosquito operation was a high-level attack on Cologne as a follow-on to the "thousand-bomber" raid on the city. It was not the best use of the new aircraft and the squadron soon moved to low-level precision attacks where the aircraft had an outstanding performance. The first precision attack was against the Gestapo Headquarters in Oslo on 25 September 1942. The squadron was the first to do a daylight raid on Berlin on 30 January 1943. By June 1943 the squadron joined No. 8 (Pathfinder) Group and upgraded to Oboe-equipped Mosquito Mk.IXs. It performed precision target-marking for Bomber Command until the end of the war. The squadron was disbanded at RAF Upwood on 1 February 1946. Between 1949 and 1957 the squadron was linked with 109 Squadron as 109/105 Squadron, but on 21 February 1962 the squadron re-formed in its own right at RAF Benson with the Armstrong Whitworth Argosy, a medium-range tactical transport. By June it had moved to RAF Khormaksar, Aden, to provide support to ground forces in the area. It also carried out transport runs through the middle-east and parts of Africa. It was involved in paradropping supplies to the British Army during operations in the Radfan and was also involved in supporting the operations in Borneo. In 1966 it was supporting troops in Aden again. When the terrorist activity worsened, it was also tasked with providing search-and-rescue searches over the Indian Ocean and Red Sea. As the British withdrawal from Aden got nearer the squadron moved out the Muharraq, Bahrain, in 1967. On 20 January 1968 the squadron disbanded for the last time there.

No.40 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 26th February 1916
Fate : Disbanded 1st February 1957

Hostem coelo expellere - To drive the enemy from the sky

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.40 Sqn RAF

No.40 Sqn RAF

40 Squadron Royal Air Force: 40 squadron was formed at Gosport on 26th February 1916 as a scout squadron equipped with the FE8. One flight went to France in early August and the rest of the squadron at the end of the month. However, the FE8 was soon obsolete and 40 squadron was unable to be effective in its task of fighting when faced with a faster aircraft. In March 1917 the squadron suffered heavy casualties when 9 aircraft were caught on patrol by Jasta 11 led by Manfred von Richthofen and all aircraft were brought down with four pilots killed. Before the end of March they were re-equipped with Nieuport Scouts and with these, 40 squadron began a successful career, flying offensive patrols and developing its own tactics for observation balloon attacks. During this period one of the 40 Squadron officers Lieutenant Edward Mannock (later Major Mannock VC) destroyed 6 enemy aircraft and went on to a highly successful fighting career in command of two other squadrons. Before the end of 1917, 40 Squadron replaced its scouts with the highly successful S.E.5.a and continued offensive operations against the German armed forces until the end of the First World War. It ended the war with a squadron tally of 130 enemy aircraft and 30 balloons destroyed. The squadron returned to the UK in February 1919 and was disbanded 4th July the same year. It was reformed on 1st April 1931 as a bomber squadron and served in the UK and the Middle East theatre. It was disbanded in Egypt during 1947 and reformed later that year as a transport squadron until 1950. In 1953 it was again reformed as a bomber squadron before being finally disbanded in 1956.
Aircraft for : Wing Commander D A G Parry (deceased)
A list of all aircraft associated with Wing Commander D A G Parry (deceased). A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Mosquito



Click the name above to see prints featuring Mosquito aircraft.

Manufacturer : De Havilland
Production Began : 1940
Retired : 1955
Number Built : 7781

Mosquito

Used as a night fighter, fighter bomber, bomber and Photo-reconnaissance, with a crew of two, Maximum speed was 425 mph, at 30,300 feet, 380mph at 17,000ft. and a ceiling of 36,000feet, maximum range 3,500 miles. the Mosquito was armed with four 20mm Hospano cannon in belly and four .303 inch browning machine guns in nose. Coastal strike aircraft had eight 3-inch Rockets under the wings, and one 57mm shell gun in belly. The Mossie at it was known made its first flight on 25th November 1940, and the mosquito made its first operational flight for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance unit based at Benson. In early 1942, a modified version (mark II) operated as a night fighter with 157 and 23 squadron's. In April 1943 the first De Haviland Mosquito saw service in the Far east and in 1944 The Mosquito was used at Coastal Command in its strike wings. Bomber Commands offensive against Germany saw many Mosquitos, used as photo Reconnaissance aircraft, Fighter Escorts, and Path Finders. The Mosquito stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1955. and a total of 7781 mosquito's were built.

Aviation History Timeline : 13th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
13December1918Julius Fichter, a WW1 Ace with 6.00 victories, died on this day
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, (F.A.A.) Lt. G. F. Russell of 804 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O A. H. Pettet of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O J. D. Dodd of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. H. W. Walmsly of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1940British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. S. Hamilton of 248 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, P/O H. J. Jeffcoat of 236 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1941Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. P. A. Dale of 141 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1942Former British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. B. J. E. DFC Lane of 19 Squadron, was Killed.
13December1969Viktor Bauer, a WW2 Ace with 106.00 victories, died on this day
13December2000Air Vice Marshal Sandy Johnstone CB DFC AE DL, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
13December2000Former British Battle of Britain pilot, S/Ldr. A. V. R. Johnstone DFC of 602 Squadron, Passed away.
13December2004Franz-Josef Beerenbrock, a WW2 Ace with 117.00 victories, died on this day
13December2004Franz-Josef Beerenbrock, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
13December2004Knight's Cross recipient Franz-Josef Beerenbrock of 10./Jagdgeschwader 51 died on this day

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page