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Flying Officer Leslie Rosser

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Joined the RAF in April 1941, having transferred from the Army. After two months, he was on his way to the USA via Iceland and Canada. He entered the USA at Detroit, in July 1941, on a student visa and wearing civilian clothes. His pilot training started in Florida at a civilian flying school with most of the instructors being old barnstormers from flying circuses etc. Discipline was maintained by a few US Army officers. Most of the pupils were ex-British Army, so the change of food, climate etc was much appreciated. The final course, before receiving the US Army wings was carried out flying Harvards. The course was completed mid-February and the return to Canada followed. On return to the UK and after some delays the conversion to twin-engined planes was completed at RAF Assington. The OTU course started at Wellesbourne in September 1942, flying Wellingtons, and a full crew formed of pilot, navigator, bomb-aimer, wireless operator and rear-gunner. The crew were posted to 420 Squadron of RCAF at Middleton St George in January 1942. Operations were carried out on targets from Hamburg to St Nazaire - Bomber Command was under pressure to assist the war against U-boats. The last operation over Germany for the crew was on March 5th 1943 and was an historic one for Bomber Command, as the target at Essen was marked by a system called Oboe. This involved a high flying Mosquito and various radio and radar equipment. The crew were posted in April 1943 to 142 Squadron - one of the two RAF Squadrons attached to the US North West African Airforce under General Doolittle. The RAF Squadrons did the night bombing on targets in Tunisia, Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. Twenty-one operations by the crew involved dropping 4,000lb block-busters. After returning to the UK in August 1943, FISgt Rosser instructed at Bruntingthorpe OTU and later after being commissioned, at Edgehill. After VE day he converted to flying Mosquitos at Barford St John and was posted to 128 Squadron at Warboys the day the first atomic bomb was dropped on Japan. Since the Squadron was destined for Okinawa it meant there would be no second tours of operations and the Squadron was posted to Melsbroek, now Brussels Airport, to join the 2nd Tactical Airforce. Flying consisted mostly of exercises and formations flying over parts of Germany. He was discharged in February 1946.

Items Signed by Flying Officer Leslie Rosser

 Soon to be cloaked in darkness, Wellington aircraft of 150 Squadron, RAF Newton, Nottinghamshire, prepare for another dangerous mission, never knowing if they would return. ......
Final Preparations by Philip West.
Price : £150.00
Soon to be cloaked in darkness, Wellington aircraft of 150 Squadron, RAF Newton, Nottinghamshire, prepare for another dangerous mission, never knowing if they would return. ......

Quantity:
Soon to be cloaked in darkness, Wellington aircraft of 150 Squadron, RAF Newton, Nottinghamshire, prepare for another dangerous mission, never knowing if they would return.......
Final Preparations by Philip West. (AP)
Price : £195.00
Soon to be cloaked in darkness, Wellington aircraft of 150 Squadron, RAF Newton, Nottinghamshire, prepare for another dangerous mission, never knowing if they would return.......

Quantity:

Packs with at least one item featuring the signature of Flying Officer Leslie Rosser

Flying Officer Leslie Rosser

Squadrons for : Flying Officer Leslie Rosser
A list of all squadrons known to have been served with by Flying Officer Leslie Rosser. A profile page is available by clicking the squadron name.
SquadronInfo

No.128 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 1st February 1918
Fate : Disbanded 31st March 1946

Fulminis instar - Like a thunderbolt

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No.128 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.142 Sqn RAF

Country : UK
Founded : 2nd February 1918
Fate : Disbanded 24th May 1963

Determination

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No.142 Sqn RAF

Full profile not yet available.

No.420 Sqn RCAF

Country : Canada
Founded : 19th December 1941
Fate : Disbanded 5th September 1945
Snowy Owl

Pugnamus finitum - We fight to the finish

Click the name above to see prints featuring aircraft of No.420 Sqn RCAF

No.420 Sqn RCAF

Full profile not yet available.
Aircraft for : Flying Officer Leslie Rosser
A list of all aircraft associated with Flying Officer Leslie Rosser. A profile page including a list of all art prints for the aircraft is available by clicking the aircraft name.
SquadronInfo

Harvard

Click the name above to see prints featuring Harvard aircraft.

Manufacturer : North American Aviation
Production Began : 1935
Retired : 1995
Number Built : 15495

Harvard

The Texan originated from the North American NA-16 prototype (first flown on April 1, 1935) which, modified as the NA-26, was submitted as an entry for a USAAC "Basic Combat" aircraft competition in March, 1937. The first model went into production and 180 were supplied to the USAAC as the BC-1 and 400 to the RAF as the Harvard I. The US Navy received 16 modified aircraft, designated the SNJ-1, and a further 61 as the SNJ-2 with a different engine. The BC-1 was the production version of the NA-26 prototype, with retractable tailwheel landing gear and the provision for armament, a two-way radio, and the 550-hp (410 kW) R-1340-47 engine as standard equipment. Production versions included the BC-1 (Model NA-36) with only minor modifications (177 built), of which 30 were modified as BC-1I instrument trainers; the BC-1A (NA-55) with airframe revisions (92 built); and a single BC-1B with a modified wing center-section. Three BC-2 aircraft were built before the shift to the "advanced trainer" designation, AT-6, which was equivalent to the BC-1A. The differences between the AT-6 and the BC-1 were new outer wing panels with a swept-forward trailing edge, squared-off wingtips, and a triangular rudder, producing the canonical Texan silhouette. After a change to the rear of the canopy, the AT-6 was designated the Harvard II for RAF/RCAF orders and 1,173 were supplied by purchase or Lend Lease, mostly operating in Canada as part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Next came the AT-6A which was based on the NA-77 design and was powered by the Pratt & Whitney R-1340-49 Wasp radial engine. The USAAF received 1,549 and the US Navy 270 (as the SNJ-3). The AT-6B was built for gunnery training and could mount a .30 in machine gun on the forward fuselage. It used the R-1340-AN-1 engine, which was to become the standard for the remaining T-6 production. Canada's Noorduyn Aviation built an R-1340-AN-1-powered version of the AT-6A, which was supplied to the USAAF as the AT-16 (1,500 aircraft) and the RAF/RCAF as the Harvard IIB (2,485 aircraft), some of which also served with the Fleet Air Arm and Royal Canadian Navy. No. 1340 Flight RAF used the Harvard in Kenya against the Mau Mau in the 1950s, where they operated with 20-lb bombs and machine guns against the rebels. Some operations took place at altitudes around 20,000 ft above mean sea level. A Harvard was the longest-serving RAF aeroplane,

Mosquito



Click the name above to see prints featuring Mosquito aircraft.

Manufacturer : De Havilland
Production Began : 1940
Retired : 1955
Number Built : 7781

Mosquito

Used as a night fighter, fighter bomber, bomber and Photo-reconnaissance, with a crew of two, Maximum speed was 425 mph, at 30,300 feet, 380mph at 17,000ft. and a ceiling of 36,000feet, maximum range 3,500 miles. the Mosquito was armed with four 20mm Hospano cannon in belly and four .303 inch browning machine guns in nose. Coastal strike aircraft had eight 3-inch Rockets under the wings, and one 57mm shell gun in belly. The Mossie at it was known made its first flight on 25th November 1940, and the mosquito made its first operational flight for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance unit based at Benson. In early 1942, a modified version (mark II) operated as a night fighter with 157 and 23 squadron's. In April 1943 the first De Haviland Mosquito saw service in the Far east and in 1944 The Mosquito was used at Coastal Command in its strike wings. Bomber Commands offensive against Germany saw many Mosquitos, used as photo Reconnaissance aircraft, Fighter Escorts, and Path Finders. The Mosquito stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1955. and a total of 7781 mosquito's were built.

Wellington



Click the name above to see prints featuring Wellington aircraft.

Manufacturer : Vickers
Production Began : 1938
Retired : 1953

Wellington

The Vickers Wellington was a Bomber aircraft and also used for maritime reconnaissance. and had a normal crew of six except in the MKV and VI where a crew of three was used. Maximum speed was 235 mph (MK1c) 255 mph (MK III, X) and 299 mph (MK IIII), normal operating range of 1805 miles (except MK III which was 1470miles) The Wellington or Wimpy as it was known, was the major bomber of the Royal Air Force between 1939 and 1943. The Royal Air Force received its first Wellingtons in October 1938 to 99 squadron. and by the outbreak of World war two there were 6 squadrons equipped with the Vickers Wellington. Due to heavy losses on daylight raids, the Wellington became a night bomber and from 1940 was also used as a long range bomber in North Africa. and in 1942 also became a long range bomber for the royal Air Force in India. It was well used by Coastal Command as a U-Boat Hunter. The Wellington remained in service with the Royal Air Force until 1953. Probably due to its versatile use, The aircraft was also used for experimental work including the fitting of a pressure cabin for High altitude tests. The Vickers Wellington could sustain major damage and still fly, probably due to its construction of its geodesic structure and practical application of geodesic lines. Designed by Sir Barnes Wallis

Aviation History Timeline : 11th December
DAYMONTHYEARDETAILS
11December1928Gustav Dorr, a WW1 Ace with 35.00 victories, died on this day
11December1943Johannes Bunzek, a WW2 Ace with 75.00 victories, died on this day
11December1943Knight's Cross recipient Johannes Bunzek of 7./Jagdgeschwader 52 died on this day
11December1943Rudolf Wagner, a WW2 Ace with 81.00 victories, died on this day
11December1974E Lussier, a WW1 Ace with 9.00 victories, died on this day
11December1986Air Chief Marshal Sir Augustus Walker GCB CBE DSO DFC AFC, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day
11December2006Former British Battle of Britain pilot, Sgt. J. R. Toombs of 236 Squadron, Passed away.
11December2006J R Toombs, whose signature is on some of our aviation art, died on this day

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